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  • Market Tips: Why Dollar Must Decouple from Stocks Friday, 12 Dec 2008 | 7:08 AM ET

    The dollar dived to a 13-year low against the yen on Friday after the U.S. Senate failed to agree a bailout for U.S. automakers, raising the prospect Japanese authorities may intervene to stem the yen's rise.

  • Fed Data Notes: Turmoil Swept US Economy Thursday, 11 Dec 2008 | 7:12 PM ET

    Numbers from the fed today demonstrated the turmoil that swept our ecoomy in the third quarter.

  • Vanguard's Bogle: Homeowner Bailout Is Needed Thursday, 11 Dec 2008 | 3:25 PM ET

    The survival of the U.S. economy depends on helping homeowners, said John Bogle, The Vanguard Group founder and former CEO.

  • Fannie's Change Still Won't Save Mortgage Modifications Thursday, 11 Dec 2008 | 2:25 PM ET

    I applaud Fannie for trying to get ahead of the defaults, and I hope borrowers who don’t really need the workouts don’t waste Fannie’s time trying to get something for nothing. I fear that’s a big possibility.

  • See What People Are Saying About... Rate Cuts Thursday, 11 Dec 2008 | 12:51 PM ET

    Is it time for the Fed to stand up to Wall Street and stop cutting interest rates?

  • Pros Say:  Bankruptcies Ahead...Buy Consumer Staples Thursday, 11 Dec 2008 | 10:50 AM ET

    Congressional wrangling over an auto-industry bailout continued to dominate expectations on Thursday, complicated by more downbeat data about initial claims for unemployment benefits.  But some analysts interviewed by CNBC found diamonds among the lumps of coal.

  • Market Tips: How to Survive the Bear Market Thursday, 11 Dec 2008 | 8:49 AM ET

    Global markets were wobbly Thursday, hurt by uncertainty over a $14 billion rescue plan for U.S. automakers. In the midst of the increased market volatility, experts interviewed by CNBC advise investors to stay cautious and diversified to survive the bear market.

  • Save Homes By "Selling" Equity In Them To Investors? Wednesday, 10 Dec 2008 | 2:38 PM ET
    Homes and dice

    The idea is that if a borrower can’t afford a home because the mortgage payment or principal is too high, they can instead sell equity in their home to a passive investor who would consequently share the equity gains or losses.

  • Pros Say: Commodities to Lead Big S&P Rally Wednesday, 10 Dec 2008 | 2:37 PM ET

    Murky signs: Markets had rallied Wednesday morning on the belief that an auto industry bailout was all but certain. But some GOP legislators are opposing the White House deal with congressional Democrats. A top analyst sees financials in critical condition until 2010, but a peer says he's been buying bank stocks and socking them away. And a CNBC guest said commodities are going to lead a 50% S&P rally.

  • Market Tips: A Light Recovery in 2009 Wednesday, 10 Dec 2008 | 8:19 AM ET

    Hopes that governments worldwide will aid ailing industries and implement stimulus measures to fight against a deepening economic crisis lifted Asian stocks Wednesday. Experts tell CNBC an end is near for the economic gloom.

  • Pros Say: Jump on Santa Rally — Then Buy Energy Tuesday, 9 Dec 2008 | 4:05 PM ET

    An auto industry bailout package seems inevitable Tuesday — and the dollar and U.S. stocks are riding the expectation higher. The news continued to be glum for small business owners struggling with the recession and retailers, whose holiday sales may be even weaker than expected. But top analysts told CNBC they expect a Christmas-New Year's Eve rally and see an energy stock recovery in the works.

  • Market Tips: Stay Skeptical about the Rally Tuesday, 9 Dec 2008 | 7:15 AM ET

    Monday's market rally was short-lived with Asian stocks making humble gains while European stocks fell Tuesday. In the midst of the market volatility, experts tell investors to tread carefully around the rallies but that there are some signs of a market bottom.

  • Obama's plan to spend billions on infrastructure appears aimed at helping cash-strapped states as much as the average worker.

  • For several months, in discussions about the various and varied loan modification programs out there, we've been noting that re-defaults are rising, but we never actually had any numbers. Today we do.

  • President-elect Barack Obama announced over the weekend that his plan to stimulate the nation's lagging economy involves making big investments in infrastructure. CNBC asked the pros to weigh in on the president-elect's proposal.

  • Pros Say: Market Bottom Has Started Monday, 8 Dec 2008 | 12:49 PM ET

    The White House said Monday it was "very likely" to reach a deal with Congress to aid U.S. auto makers — providing Democratic legislators can offer specific terms. Meanwhile, more glum earnings and job-cut statements came from 3M, MetLife and Dow Chemical. Crunching these concepts together, experts told CNBC that the market is bottoming and the smart money is quietly starting to buy up energy, tech stocks — and airlines.

  • Market Tips: Catch This Multi-Month Rally Monday, 8 Dec 2008 | 8:27 AM ET
    Gold Bars

    Global stocks started the week in the green, with the Hang Seng index closing over 8 percent higher, on investors' optimism over a possible U.S. automakers bailout. CNBC's experts deem this rally to be a big one and for investors to get off the sidelines and get back into stocks.

  • With gas cheaper, mortgage rates coming down and a winter of cheaper heating bills to possibly look forward to, there might be reason for some holiday cheer.

  • As one industry-type put it to me, we thought we were going to be seeing the light at the end of the tunnel by 2009, now we see a runaway freight train coming back at us.

  • Pros Say: Oil Price Plunge = Huge Tax Cut Friday, 5 Dec 2008 | 12:49 PM ET

    Blacker Friday? Job losses in November were the worst since 1974, as U.S. employers cut payrolls by 533,000. Mortgage loan delinquencies and foreclosures hit record highs in the third quarter — though one economist likes falling mortgage rates. Merrill Lynch cut its oil forecast, saying a temporary downspike of $25 is even possible. But one analyst praised the oil plunge as the equivalent of a "huge tax cut."