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  • European Stocks Close Mixed; Markets Await Rates News Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 12:29 PM ET

    European stocks closed the week mixed as euphoria over lower-than-expected U.S. inflation data waned, and investors began looking ahead to next week's interest rate decisions from the European Central Bank and Bank of England.

  • Atlanta Federal Reserve Bank President Dennis Lockhart said on Friday that market turmoil could hit the U.S. economy and that a moderation in inflation gave the Fed room to cut interest rates last week.

  • Investment bank Goldman Sachs has slashed its forecasts for economic growth in the United States, Japan and Europe, joining numerous forecasters who are abruptly changing view since the start of a global credit crunch.

  • Euro-Zone Inflation, Sentiment Signals ECB on Hold Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 7:26 AM ET

    Euro zone inflation rebounded in September above the European Central Bank's target for the first time in a year but market turmoil depressed economic sentiment, making another ECB interest rate rise less likely.

  • Fed's Mishkin Says Inflation Is Low Thanks to Policy Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 4:01 AM ET

    Tight central bank monetary policies and well-grounded expectations of low inflation are to thank for low inflation in recent years, not globalization, Federal Reserve Governor Frederic Mishkin said on Thursday.

  • Greenspan: Less than 50% Chance of Recession Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 3:57 AM ET

    The probability of the U.S. economy slipping into recession has increased recently but is still less than 50/50, former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greeenspan said in comments broadcast on Friday.

  • C'mon Germany, Show Me the Money! Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 3:56 AM ET

    I am writing this in Munich airport, yet again waiting for another delayed flight. Getting around Europe these days by aircraft is a frustrating business. Planes are full and aircraft movements appear to be overwhelming the ability of both the airlines and the air-traffic controllers to keep schedules. This notwithstanding the 'flexibility' of departure times already built into the timetable.

  • China Says to Tighten Property Lending Thursday, 27 Sep 2007 | 11:27 PM ET

    China on Friday unveiled a series of measures to tighten property lending in its latest attempt to cool the country's overheating real estate market and curb mortgage lending risks.

  • Dollar Slides as Housing, Growth Fears Mount Thursday, 27 Sep 2007 | 4:48 PM ET

    The dollar fell to record lows Thursday, hit by fresh evidence that a weak housing market could crimp U.S. growth and force the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates again.

  • Credit Crunch: Real Or Just A Crumple? Thursday, 27 Sep 2007 | 4:03 PM ET

    Is the credit crunch becoming more of a crumple? There certainly are encouraging signs of life in the credit markets where just a few weeks ago there was a scary paralysis. But it's too soon to call an end to the crisis even though the stock market is clearly taking the improvements to heart.

  • Sallie Mae Shares Rebound as Deal Hopes Revive Thursday, 27 Sep 2007 | 12:48 PM ET
    Sallie Mae

    Shares of Sallie Mae recovered some ground on Thursday, as traders bet that the endangered $25 billion deal to take over the student lender could be renegotiated at a lower price.

  • D.R. Horton: It's Now Down To The Highest Bidder? Wednesday, 26 Sep 2007 | 2:57 PM ET

    Forgive me for posting a little bit late today, but I’ve been waiting for a call back from the press contact at D.R. Horton all morning, and now that it’s afternoon, I’ve decided to give up. I called the company (three times) to ask for a bit more information regarding an auction of 53 new D.R. Horton-built homes in San Diego this weekend.

  • Markets Just 'Loving' To Hear The Bad News? Wednesday, 26 Sep 2007 | 12:22 PM ET

    We're back in the "bad news is good news" phase. At least that's how you may want to read the stock market's reaction to today's clunker of a durable goods number, its worst monthly reading since January. Durable orders fell by 4.9% in August, below the 3.5% decline expected and way off from July's 6.1% increase.

  • Foreclosure USA: I Report And You Respond Wednesday, 26 Sep 2007 | 10:50 AM ET

    Here are your responses to my recent reports on foreclosures (here and here) in California. Mike from NY says people got talked into buying a house when they had no business doing so: "...all these people thought they were Donald Trump."

  • Dollar Fights Back, Shrugs Off Softer Durables Data Wednesday, 26 Sep 2007 | 10:28 AM ET

    The dollar rebounded from record lows against the euro Wednesday, brushing aside a steeper-than-expected fall in August durable goods orders as buyers took advantage of cheap exchange rates.

  • Durable-Goods Orders Take Biggest Dive in 7 Months Wednesday, 26 Sep 2007 | 10:14 AM ET

    New orders for costly U.S.-manufactured goods dropped at the sharpest rate in seven months during August as demand fell across nearly every major category.

  • ECB Lends 3-Month Funds at Highest Rate Since 2001 Wednesday, 26 Sep 2007 | 8:29 AM ET

    The European Central Bank allotted 50 billion euros of three-month refinancing on Wednesday at an average rate of 4.63% -- the highest since March 2001 and evidence of continued tightness on the euro money market.

  • U.S. Mortgage Applications Slid Last Week: MBA Wednesday, 26 Sep 2007 | 7:11 AM ET

    U.S. home loan applications slumped last week after climbing for three straight weeks, an industry group said Wednesday, as falling demand for home purchase loans overshadowed a fourth consecutive weekly rise in refinancing requests.

  • Dollar Hits Fourth New Low in Four Days vs. Euro Tuesday, 25 Sep 2007 | 5:48 PM ET

    The dollar hit a new record low against the euro Tuesday as a surprise plunge in U.S. consumer confidence to nearly two-year lows raised expectations of another Federal Reserve interest rate cut next month.

  • Home Foreclosures: Only Thing 'Funny' Is The Money Tuesday, 25 Sep 2007 | 5:15 PM ET

    There's nothing funny about today's post, other than the funny money that went into mortgages. I am on the ground on Henry Long Blvd. in Stockton, CA. This is truly the epicenter of the foreclosure earthquake. I would say one out of every eight homes in this neighborhood is for sale: and you know which ones are vacant because the lawns are dead.