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  • Huge Job Losses Could Be Signal That Worst Is Over Friday, 5 Dec 2008 | 12:00 PM ET

    Once the initial knee-jerk doom-and-gloom reaction is over, something resembling optimism will prevail in the conclusion that the worst is over for the economy.

  • CEOs Weigh In on How To Revive Economy Friday, 5 Dec 2008 | 10:56 AM ET

    Job losses hit 533,000 in November, the markets continue to swing like a pendulum and Congress is weighing a major restructuring of the Big Three automakers. To help viewers make sense of the current economic environment, CNBC asked the experts to share their insight.

  • Market Tips: Cash, Gold and Managed Futures Friday, 5 Dec 2008 | 6:57 AM ET

    Global markets were mixed Friday ahead of the November nonfarm payrolls data out in the U.S. Crude fell almost 7 percent overnight as market volatility persisted. Analysts interviewed by CNBC give their views on where to invest.

  • Stocks Drop 200 Amid Economic Worries Thursday, 4 Dec 2008 | 4:23 PM ET

    Stocks ended sharply lower Thursday amid anxiety over a fresh round of layoffs, dismal same-store sales numbers and the prospect of tomorrow's jobs report.

  • Policymakers Shifting Focus Of Bailout  Thursday, 4 Dec 2008 | 4:17 PM ET
    WALL STREET IN CRISIS - A CNBC SPECIAL REPORT

    Having thrown trillions of dollars at Wall Street, the Fed and Treasury now appear ready to do the same for Main Street by proposing help for the housing market.

  • Did Someone Leak Treasury 4.5% Mortgage 'Plan'? Thursday, 4 Dec 2008 | 4:02 PM ET
    Mortgage

    It’s truly amazing to me that a lobbyist who really needs something from the government would leak just the possibility of that something to the media, when that leakage would only harm their industry. Of course, I’m talking about the Treasury proposal/possibility/plan to buy mortgage debt at a rate that would allow lenders to offer buyers a 4.5 percent interest rate on the 30-year fixed.

  • Pros Say: Bear Market Rallies = New Reality Thursday, 4 Dec 2008 | 1:47 PM ET

    Lousy sales, weak earnings and more layoffs reigned over Thursday, with glum news from Nokia, Viacom, Merck, AT&T, DuPont, Credit Suisse and retailers across the board. European central banks enacted big rate cuts. And  Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke urged more government efforts to stanch soaring home foreclosures. But CNBC heard from experts who say that while the news will get worse through 2009, markets will periodically rally — and one strategist sees the Dow at 12,000 in 2010.

  • Bernanke: 'More Needs To Be Done' on Foreclosures Thursday, 4 Dec 2008 | 12:31 PM ET
    Foreclosure

    Fed Chairman Bernanke called on the government to ramp up efforts to stem soaring home foreclosures.

  • Stocks Move Lower in Choppy Trading Thursday, 4 Dec 2008 | 12:10 PM ET

    Stocks opened lower Thursday amid a fresh round of layoffs and dismal same-store sales numbers, but soon turned mixed after an unexpected drop in jobless claims and better-than-expected factory-orders report.

  • Carmen: Time Is Right to Refinance Your Mortgage Thursday, 4 Dec 2008 | 12:09 PM ET

    Believe it or not, there's some good news out there for homeowners.

  • CEOs Sound Off: Budget Deficit, Bailouts & More Thursday, 4 Dec 2008 | 11:35 AM ET

    As U.S. automakers sell their rescue plan to Congress on Thursday and the markets digest more grim jobs data, CNBC asked American CEOs their perspective on the economy, budget and bailouts.

  • Stocks Pare Losses After Factory Report Thursday, 4 Dec 2008 | 11:04 AM ET

    Stocks opened lower Thursday amid a fresh round of layoffs and dismal same-store sales numbers, but soon turned mixed after an unexpected drop in jobless claims and better-than-expected factory-orders report.

  • Futures Get Hit By New Round of Layoffs Thursday, 4 Dec 2008 | 8:17 AM ET

    U.S. stock index futures were getting battered by a fresh round of layoff announcements by some major companies and mostly dismal news about retail sales.

  • Market Tips: Oil May Fall to $20, Stagflation Coming Thursday, 4 Dec 2008 | 7:14 AM ET

    Despite the unexpected drawback in U.S. crude inventories, oil prices continued their fall Thursday, to below $46 a barrel, near four-year lows, as economic fears deepened. As the downturn persists, analysts interviewed by CNBC suggest oil could fall to $20 a barrel.

  • Pros Say: Fed Moves Can Kill Recession (UPDATED) Wednesday, 3 Dec 2008 | 4:46 PM ET

    President-elect Barack Obama nominated Gov. Bill Richardson (D-NM) for commerce secretary Wednesday, the same day that United Auto Workers President Ron Gettelfinger announced the UAW would make huge concessions in order to help the Big 3 automakers nail government bailout funds. CNBC heard from experts who said the drop in gasoline prices bodes well for the first quarter and Ben Bernanke just may save us from a severe recession. (UPDATED)

  • What Fed, Treasury May Do Next to Ease Credit Crisis Wednesday, 3 Dec 2008 | 12:50 PM ET

    The heads of the Fed and Treasury are signaling that they plan to take  more steps to ease credit and jump-start the economy.

  • Mortgage Applications Up, But Are They 'Real'? Wednesday, 3 Dec 2008 | 12:33 PM ET

    It should come as no surprise to anyone that mortgage applications would surge last week, after the Fed announced it would buy GSE debt and mortgage-backed securities. Interest rates on the 30-year fixed dropped nearly a full percentage point.

  • Market Tips: Why Credit Trumps Stocks Wednesday, 3 Dec 2008 | 8:38 AM ET

    As markets continued their volatile trade Wednesday, low-risk assets like U.S. Treasuries retained their luster, despite offering the lowest yields in decades. Betting on credit may offer better returns than stocks, some analysts say.

  • Cramer's Problem With Doom and Gloom Tuesday, 2 Dec 2008 | 6:01 PM ET

    Stop worrying about another Great Depression. It's not going to happen.

  • Pros: Searching the Gloom ... Bright Spot in Japan Tuesday, 2 Dec 2008 | 1:19 PM ET

    Licking their wounds after the Dow's fourth-worst daily point drop, fund managers and economists regroup.