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  • Goldman Slashes Growth Outlook, Sees Lower Rates Tuesday, 27 Nov 2007 | 11:15 AM ET

    Goldman Sachs on Tuesday slashed its target for the expected trough in U.S. benchmark interest rates by a full percentage point, citing an increased probability of recession and the likelihood of a prolonged period of sluggish performance for the U.S. economy.

  • Happy Holidays? Recession Worries Are On the Rise Monday, 26 Nov 2007 | 6:26 PM ET
    Foreclosured Home

    A parade of economic data in the next couple weeks will tell volumes about the economy and the Fed’s chances for achieving a soft landing.

  • Ex-U.S. Treasury Head Summers: Recession Likely Monday, 26 Nov 2007 | 11:37 AM ET

    The odds now point to a U.S. economic recession that slows global growth significantly even if necessary policy changes are implemented, former U.S. Treasury secretary Larry Summers said.

  • European Stock Markets Set to Open Higher Friday, 23 Nov 2007 | 1:57 AM ET

    European shares are expected to edge higher on Friday, following a mostly upbeat session in Asia but gains will likely be tempered as investors wait for U.S. markets to reopen after a public holiday.

  • Paulson Sees More Home Loan Defaults in 2008 Wednesday, 21 Nov 2007 | 8:35 PM ET
    Treasury Secretary, Henry Paulson

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson said the number of potential U.S. home-loan defaults "will be significantly bigger" in 2008 than in 2007, the Wall Street Journal's online edition reported.

  • Stocks Get Crushed; S&P In Red for Year Wednesday, 21 Nov 2007 | 7:17 PM ET

    Stocks closed sharply lower as worries about the mortgage market and broader economy triggered selling among nervous investors ahead of the holiday shopping season.

  • Americans In A Foul Mood As Holidays Approach Wednesday, 21 Nov 2007 | 12:42 PM ET

    The mood among consumers hit the skids in November as gasoline prices soared and the housing slump worsened.

  • The Consumer's Last Stand Wednesday, 21 Nov 2007 | 12:31 PM ET

    Everyone has heard predictions of a tapped-out consumer. And though they haven't materialized in the past, this time is likely to be different.

  • S&P Expects Fed to Cut Funds Rates to 3.5% in 2008 Wednesday, 21 Nov 2007 | 10:02 AM ET

    Standard & Poor's expects the U.S. Federal Reserve to cut interest rates to 3.5 percent in 2008 to deal with the fallout from the housing market, S&P's chief European economist said on Wednesday at a banking conference in London.

  • Dollar Lower, Oil Higher As Fear Ruling Street Wednesday, 21 Nov 2007 | 9:20 AM ET

    The confluence of major market moves today is stunning as fear once more rules Wall Street. The dollar is at a record low, oil edges towards $100 per barrel, the 10-year Treasury fell below 4%, a level it hasn't seen in years, and stocks are heading sharply lower after a big sell off overseas.

  • Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac: What They've Done To Housing Wednesday, 21 Nov 2007 | 8:01 AM ET

    Since I'm starting my holiday early today (I'll be back on Monday), I thought I'd provide you with an interesting take on all the Fannie and Freddie news from a good source of mine, mortgage consultant and former HUD official, Howard Glaser. What follows are this thoughts:

  • BoE Voted 7-2 to Keep Rates on Hold Wednesday, 21 Nov 2007 | 5:46 AM ET

    Bank of England deputy governor John Gieve joined arch dove David Blanchflower in voting for lower interest rates this month, but the other seven policymakers chose to keep them at 5.75 percent.

  • Fed Sees Slower Growth But Wary of Cutting Rates Tuesday, 20 Nov 2007 | 8:33 PM ET
    Cash Register

    The Federal Reserve is expecting slower growth and lower inflation next year. But minutes from the Fed's October meeting show policymarkers were reluctant to cut interest rates further.

  • Stocks End Higher After Another Wild Session Tuesday, 20 Nov 2007 | 5:02 PM ET

    Stocks closed higher after another volatile session, helped by a rally among energy shares as oil soared to a record high close of $98 a barrel.

  • Exclusive: Treasury May Discuss National Sales Tax Tuesday, 20 Nov 2007 | 1:51 PM ET

    A U.S. Treasury report on ways to cut corporate taxes will include discussion of a national sales tax, a senior Treasury official told CNBC.

  • I guess it shouldn’t be surprising, but the numbers for Freddie Mac's third quarter losses are really phenomenal. One analyst we called this morning said, “Freddie is a disaster,” and he said we could quote him on that. I won’t, but here’s what’s so striking to me.

  • Housing Outlook Still Gloomy Despite New Building Tuesday, 20 Nov 2007 | 12:15 PM ET

    Groundbreaking for U.S. housing rebounded in October but permits for future building hit a 14-year low, indicating the grim market for home construction will likely continue to worsen.

  • Markets, Fed Still at Odds Over Outlook for Economy Tuesday, 20 Nov 2007 | 8:01 AM ET
    Traders at SIG Specialists trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange talk among themselves shortly after the opening bell Monday, April 18, 2005, in New York.  Stocks regained some stability Monday following a three-day selloff as strong first-quarter earnings and a pair of merger announcements lent some support to a market battered by worries about economic growth.  (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

    The  Fed and financial markets remain at odds over where the economy and interest rates are heading, and fresh Fed forecasts to be released Tuesday are unlikely to bridge that gap.

  • Market Insider/Tuesday Look Ahead Monday, 19 Nov 2007 | 4:49 PM ET

    One of my mother's favorite lines is the one about not saying anything if you can't think of something nice to say. Well that was the story of the markets Monday. What a day of angst. Look at this headline from a note sent by MF Global's Andy Brenner Monday afternoon: "The market has traded like a crazed man with no liquidity." Yikes.

  • Stocks Plunge on More Credit, Housing Woes Monday, 19 Nov 2007 | 4:09 PM ET

    Stocks closed sharply lower after a brokerage downgrade of Citigroup sparked concerns that there may be more mortgage losses to come, raising doubts about the outlook for the economy.