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  • Paulson Signals He Expects Dollar Rebound Friday, 16 Nov 2007 | 10:14 AM ET

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson said on Friday Washington was following a strong dollar policy and indicated he expected it to rebound, emphasising the U.S. economy's long-term strength should help the currency.

  • Industrial Production Unexpectedly Falls 0.5% Friday, 16 Nov 2007 | 10:13 AM ET

    U.S. industrial production unexpectedly fell in October, logging a 0.5 percent decrease, as output shrank at factories, mines and utilities, a Federal Reserve report on Friday showed.

  • Fed's Kroszner: Policy to Aid Economy in Rough Patch Friday, 16 Nov 2007 | 8:59 AM ET

    The Federal Reserve's current policy stance should be just right to help the U.S. economy weather a rough patch in months ahead without triggering inflation, Fed Governor Randall Kroszner said on Friday.

  • US Stocks Fall On Credit Worries Thursday, 15 Nov 2007 | 11:16 AM ET

    US stocks closed an uneasy session lower as investors, uncertain if the worst of the credit crisis is over, refrained from extending Tuesday's huge advance.

  • Consumer Inflation Remains Tame in October Thursday, 15 Nov 2007 | 9:33 AM ET
    Cash Register

    U.S. consumer prices rose a brisk 0.3 percent in October, which was in line with expectations and driven by the sharpest rise in energy costs in five months, the government reported on Thursday.

  • Retail Sales Rise Sluggish 0.2%; Inflation Is Tame Wednesday, 14 Nov 2007 | 11:40 AM ET

    U.S. retail sales rose a sluggish 0.2 percent in October while an inflation measure grew less than expected, according to government data Wednesday that may give the Federal Reserve more leeway to prop up a slowing economy.

  • Ben Bernanke's Speech: Federal Reserve Communications Wednesday, 14 Nov 2007 | 9:24 AM ET

    The prepared speech given by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke on Federal Reserve communications at the Cato Institute 25th Annual Monetary Conference in Washington, D.C. on November 14, 2007.

  • BoE's King Warns of Stocks Downturn Risk Wednesday, 14 Nov 2007 | 9:03 AM ET

    Stock markets around the world could be in line for falls and this could cause major ructions for the global economy, Bank of England Governor Mervyn King said on Wednesday.

  • Bank of England Points to Lower Interest Rates Wednesday, 14 Nov 2007 | 6:49 AM ET

    British interest rates will need to fall in the coming months if inflation is to hit the central bank's 2 percent target in two years, the Bank of England signalled on Wednesday.

  • US Rate Decision Depends on Data: Fed's Fisher Wednesday, 14 Nov 2007 | 6:20 AM ET

    Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas President Richard Fisher said on Wednesday a decision on interest rates at the central bank's December meeting would depend on coming data, but emphasised that the economic risks were not all on the downside.

  • Suddenly, Inflation Isn't The Market's Bogeyman Tuesday, 13 Nov 2007 | 5:06 PM ET
    Cash Register

    The good news is that inflation is less of a worry. The bad news is that economic growth is more of one.  The change in perception comes as investors prepare for key inflation data this week.

  • European Asset-Backed Securities Issuance Slows Tuesday, 13 Nov 2007 | 9:21 AM ET

    Origination of European securitisations will probably slow for the full year versus 2006, the first time this has happened since 2000, as credit market turmoil bites, the European Securitisation Forum said on Tuesday.

  • Small Business Optimism Sours on Fed Rate Cut Tuesday, 13 Nov 2007 | 8:17 AM ET

    Optimism about the U.S. economy among small businesses soured last month as a Federal Reserve interest cut intended to aid the economy instead triggered cutbacks in spending and hiring, a survey released on Tuesday showed.

  • Australia Central Bank Raises Inflation Forecasts Sunday, 11 Nov 2007 | 7:57 PM ET

    Australia's central bank on Monday raised its forecasts for underlying inflation to above  its 2 to 3 percent comfort zone, strongly suggesting that  further increases in interest rates might be needed to restrain price pressures and cool the red-hot economy

  • Week Ahead: Volatility Rules Friday, 9 Nov 2007 | 5:12 PM ET

    Extreme volatility will likely rip the stock market again in the coming week, while investors consider some fresh economic data and a last blast of earnings news. Tuesday marks one month to the day before the Fed's next rate meeting.

  • Soaring global oil costs helped drive U.S. import prices up at the steepest rate in nearly 1-1/2 years during October, according to a Labor Department report on Friday that was likely to heighten concern about energy-driven inflation.

  • Cramer’s Recession Primer Friday, 9 Nov 2007 | 10:51 AM ET

    It might be an inevitability. Here's how to defend against it.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Fed's Balancing Act On Rate Cut Getting Tougher Thursday, 8 Nov 2007 | 4:17 PM ET
    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke.

    Ben Bernanke’s latest assessment of the economy shows the Fed’s job of balancing  inflation with a slowing economy is more difficult than ever, leaving policymakers undecided on further rate cuts.

  • Fed Chief Stays Cautious On Further Rate Cuts Thursday, 8 Nov 2007 | 12:15 PM ET
    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke.

    Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke said the U.S. economy faces risks in both growth and inflation, suggesting the Fed will holding off deciding on further rate cuts.

  • Europe's "No Change Attitude" Helps Markets, Dollar Thursday, 8 Nov 2007 | 9:39 AM ET

    Bank of England and European Central Bank both left rates unchanged which helped spark a modest rally in Europe and here. Mr. Trichet, head of the ECB, talked about inflation concerns but his inaction made him appear rather dovish.