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  • China's Consumer Inflation Blazes to 11-Year High Tuesday, 11 Dec 2007 | 12:51 AM ET
    China's National Flag

    China's factory gate prices jumped 4.6 percent in the year to November, overshooting forecasts by a wide margin and fueling concern that inflation could pose a stiffer challenge than many anticipated.

  • Weak Dollar, High Oil Have U.S. Over A Barrel Tuesday, 11 Dec 2007 | 12:31 AM ET

    The two negative market trends are feeding on each other and creating double trouble for US consumers and the economy.

  • Bonds Move Lower on Pending Homes Sales, MBIA Monday, 10 Dec 2007 | 3:00 PM ET

    U.S. Treasury debt prices eased Monday after a surprise increase in pending home sales and news that a troubled bond insurer raised new capital removed some of the recent flight-to-safety bid.

  • Realtors: Home Sweet Home Sales? Maybe, Maybe Not Monday, 10 Dec 2007 | 12:29 PM ET

    I’m not saying that the Realtors are living in la-la land. They have a job to do. They have to sell houses for a living, and therefore it is in their best interests to put the most positive spin they can on the data they offer. I do, unlike some, believe their data, and I don’t think they futz with the numbers to their advantage.

  • Game Plan: What Will the Fed Do? Monday, 10 Dec 2007 | 11:40 AM ET

    The Dec. 4 meeting is just too hard to call. Better to take a pass.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Why Fed Is Expected To Cut Interest Rates Again Monday, 10 Dec 2007 | 7:51 AM ET
    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke.

    A lot has changed since the Federal Reserve hinted two months ago that it might be finished cutting interest rates for a while.

  • Japan's Machinery Orders Jump More Than Expected Sunday, 9 Dec 2007 | 8:50 PM ET

    Japanese core machinery orders rose more than expected in October, suggesting Japanese corporate activity remained resilient in the face of concerns over turmoil in global financial markets.

  • Fed's Last Move Of The Year Saturday, 8 Dec 2007 | 12:06 AM ET

    Friday’s better-than-expected jobs report could discourage the Fed from making deep cuts next week. How low will they go or will they even cut at all?

  • Week Ahead: Rock Show After the Fed Friday, 7 Dec 2007 | 7:59 PM ET

    The markets may well sit quietly ahead of the Fed's rate decision Tuesday, but after that be prepared for more rock and roll.

  • Stocks Close Flat Despite Big Drop in Oil Friday, 7 Dec 2007 | 5:50 PM ET

    Stocks closed little-changed despite of a sharp drop in oil prices that boosted shares of big manufacturers such as Boeing.

  • Stop Trading!: Buy Freeport-McMoRan Friday, 7 Dec 2007 | 5:42 PM ET

    This is Cramer's favorite play on China's growth.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • While the Bush mortgage plan reduces uncertainty short term, it has created considerable debate about the long-term implications, particularly for buyers of mortgage-backed securities. Recognizing that buyers of ARM securities were anticipating receiving a higher yield (and many now will not), Raymond James noted that...

  • Paulson Asserts Subprime Plan Isn't Federal Bailout Friday, 7 Dec 2007 | 3:25 PM ET
    Treasury Secretary, Henry Paulson

    Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson defended the Bush administration's subprime mortgage plan, telling CNBC that it is not a federal bailout.

  • Jobs Report Makes Modest Rate Cut More Likely Friday, 7 Dec 2007 | 11:45 AM ET

    Employers added 94,000 jobs in November, but a slowdown in recent months fueled speculation of a modest rate cut next week.

  • No Recession, But Housing Risky: Bush Advisor Friday, 7 Dec 2007 | 11:37 AM ET

    A senior White House economist said on Friday he believes the U.S. economy is still strong and not headed for recession, though it remains at risk from the slumping housing market.

  • Jobs Report Keeps Fed Debate A "Work In Progress" Friday, 7 Dec 2007 | 11:18 AM ET

    The slightly better-than-expected increase in November non-farm jobs gave some support to stock prices, but has done little to change the debate about what the Fed will do when it meets on Tuesday. The Street has been in hot debate about whether the Fed will trim the target 4.50 percent Fed funds rate target by a quarter or a half point.

  • Consumers Are In Gloomiest Mood in Two Years Friday, 7 Dec 2007 | 10:24 AM ET

    U.S. consumer sentiment soured for a third month in December as a housing recession andexpensive gasoline left consumers at their gloomiest since the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, a report showed Friday.

  • Reader Response

    Call it what you want: a bailout, a subprime freeze plan, or government intervention. Whatever it is or becomes, a lot of you wrote in with your opinions on the Bush/Paulson mortgage "plan." Most of what you said, to state what may be obvious, was this idea pretty much "stinks."  If I had to guess, I'd say the ratio of negative to positive emails was 30 to 1, and that's being conservative.

  • Job Growth Could Be the Key to the Fed's Decision Friday, 7 Dec 2007 | 7:21 AM ET
    Unemployment Line

    Economists predict a modest gain of 70,000 in payrolls. But a strong private-sector report has the market looking for a positive surprise that could give the Fed license to cut.

  • Japan Foreign Reserves Hit 5th Record High Friday, 7 Dec 2007 | 1:44 AM ET

    Japan's foreign reserves, the world's second-largest, rose to a record $970.185 billion at the end of November, largely because lower U.S. interest rates boosted the value of U.S. bonds held in the reserves, the Ministry of Finance said on Friday.