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  • Britain Will Raise Deposit Compensation: Darling Sunday, 30 Sep 2007 | 10:36 PM ET

    Britain will raise depositors' protection on their savings to 35,000 pounds, finance minister Alistair Darling will say on Monday after the country suffered its first bank run in more than a century last month.

  • The 42.35% Chance: A Chat with Greenspan Sunday, 30 Sep 2007 | 6:37 PM ET

    If you want to know what former Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan thinks are the current chances of a recession, try this:  When I sat down with him to do a “fireside chat” in Washington D.C., he said that he thought the odds of a recession were higher but still below 50 percent.”

  • Trichet: Transparency Best Defense Against Contagion Sunday, 30 Sep 2007 | 3:13 PM ET

    Bouts of economic and financial market turbulence over the past 25 years have shown policymakers that transparency is the best protection against contagion from such events, European Central Bank president Jean-Claude Trichet said on Saturday.

  • Dollar Hits Another Low as Rate Cut Expected Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 4:55 PM ET
    Hundred Dollar

    The dollar hit another new low Friday, as U.S. inflation data reinforced expectations that the Federal Reserve may cut interest rates again.

  • Fed's Poole: Don't Assume More Rate Cuts to Come Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 3:47 PM ET

    St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank President William Poole said on Friday he would keep an open mind on policy decisions going forward but that markets should not factor in more interest rate cuts.

  • Recession Worries Grow, But Signals Are Mixed Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 1:57 PM ET
    Unemployment Line

    Recession talk is heating up as the slumping U.S. housing market threatens to shackle free-spending consumers, yet stocks remain near record highs, indicating that many investors see little cause for alarm.

  • Consumers Keep Spending While Inflation Eases Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 1:20 PM ET

    U.S. consumers spent more freely in August, soothing immediate concerns that the housing bust would stall the economy, and inflation eased, helping clear the way for lower interest rates.

  • European Stocks Close Mixed; Markets Await Rates News Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 12:29 PM ET

    European stocks closed the week mixed as euphoria over lower-than-expected U.S. inflation data waned, and investors began looking ahead to next week's interest rate decisions from the European Central Bank and Bank of England.

  • Atlanta Federal Reserve Bank President Dennis Lockhart said on Friday that market turmoil could hit the U.S. economy and that a moderation in inflation gave the Fed room to cut interest rates last week.

  • Investment bank Goldman Sachs has slashed its forecasts for economic growth in the United States, Japan and Europe, joining numerous forecasters who are abruptly changing view since the start of a global credit crunch.

  • Euro-Zone Inflation, Sentiment Signals ECB on Hold Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 7:26 AM ET

    Euro zone inflation rebounded in September above the European Central Bank's target for the first time in a year but market turmoil depressed economic sentiment, making another ECB interest rate rise less likely.

  • Fed's Mishkin Says Inflation Is Low Thanks to Policy Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 4:01 AM ET

    Tight central bank monetary policies and well-grounded expectations of low inflation are to thank for low inflation in recent years, not globalization, Federal Reserve Governor Frederic Mishkin said on Thursday.

  • Greenspan: Less than 50% Chance of Recession Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 3:57 AM ET

    The probability of the U.S. economy slipping into recession has increased recently but is still less than 50/50, former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greeenspan said in comments broadcast on Friday.

  • C'mon Germany, Show Me the Money! Friday, 28 Sep 2007 | 3:56 AM ET

    I am writing this in Munich airport, yet again waiting for another delayed flight. Getting around Europe these days by aircraft is a frustrating business. Planes are full and aircraft movements appear to be overwhelming the ability of both the airlines and the air-traffic controllers to keep schedules. This notwithstanding the 'flexibility' of departure times already built into the timetable.

  • China Says to Tighten Property Lending Thursday, 27 Sep 2007 | 11:27 PM ET

    China on Friday unveiled a series of measures to tighten property lending in its latest attempt to cool the country's overheating real estate market and curb mortgage lending risks.

  • Dollar Slides as Housing, Growth Fears Mount Thursday, 27 Sep 2007 | 4:48 PM ET

    The dollar fell to record lows Thursday, hit by fresh evidence that a weak housing market could crimp U.S. growth and force the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates again.

  • Credit Crunch: Real Or Just A Crumple? Thursday, 27 Sep 2007 | 4:03 PM ET

    Is the credit crunch becoming more of a crumple? There certainly are encouraging signs of life in the credit markets where just a few weeks ago there was a scary paralysis. But it's too soon to call an end to the crisis even though the stock market is clearly taking the improvements to heart.

  • Sallie Mae Shares Rebound as Deal Hopes Revive Thursday, 27 Sep 2007 | 12:48 PM ET
    Sallie Mae

    Shares of Sallie Mae recovered some ground on Thursday, as traders bet that the endangered $25 billion deal to take over the student lender could be renegotiated at a lower price.

  • D.R. Horton: It's Now Down To The Highest Bidder? Wednesday, 26 Sep 2007 | 2:57 PM ET

    Forgive me for posting a little bit late today, but I’ve been waiting for a call back from the press contact at D.R. Horton all morning, and now that it’s afternoon, I’ve decided to give up. I called the company (three times) to ask for a bit more information regarding an auction of 53 new D.R. Horton-built homes in San Diego this weekend.

  • Markets Just 'Loving' To Hear The Bad News? Wednesday, 26 Sep 2007 | 12:22 PM ET

    We're back in the "bad news is good news" phase. At least that's how you may want to read the stock market's reaction to today's clunker of a durable goods number, its worst monthly reading since January. Durable orders fell by 4.9% in August, below the 3.5% decline expected and way off from July's 6.1% increase.