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  • Drugs from A to Z: Alli, Avandia, Acomplia & Zimulti Wednesday, 23 May 2007 | 1:44 PM ET

    In the middle of the Avandia blowup, GlaxoSmithKline this week is launching the new over-the-counter diet pill "Alli." The company says it's spending 150 million bucks on the first-year marketing of the formerly prescription-only Xenical from Roche.A big chunk of that is going toward a multi-pronged educational campaign to convince dieters they have to change their eating habits and exercise if they want to get the maximum benefit from Alli. That's crucial with this drug because the more fat you eat, the worse the gastrointestinal side effects. Clue: Glaxo is telling Alli users to wear dark pants and bring an extra pair to work. The company has gone so far as to set up an exhibit in New York City this week where people can get more information about Alli.

  • Wyeth Gets FDA Approval for Lybrel Birth Control Pill Tuesday, 22 May 2007 | 5:49 PM ET

    Women looking for a simple way to avoid their menstrual period could soon have access to the first birth control pill designed to let women suppress monthly bleeding indefinitely.

  • A High Dose of News & a Bit of Pharma Funny Business Tuesday, 22 May 2007 | 2:44 PM ET

    So, let's start with GlaxoSmithKline's Avandia. The stock is rebounding a little bit today after the pummeling it took yesterday. Once again, the New England Journal of Medicine study saw an "embargo break" by another media outlet. That means the news hit in the middle of the trading day yesterday, catching just about everyone by surprise. The embargo was supposed to have lifted at 5 p.m. ET yesterday, which would have given all of the stakeholders -- chiefly Glaxo -- the ability to issue their prepared press releases at the same time.

  • Dendreon TV Thursday, 10 May 2007 | 11:35 AM ET

    While I'm watching the webcast of the FDA Advisory Committee Meeting on the anemia drugs (Amgen, Johnson & Johnson), I wanted to hop on my TV versus print soapbox one more time.As I posted yesterday, I had asked a Dendreon spokeswoman for an interview with CEO Dr. Mitchell Gold in the wake of the FDA sending the company an "approvable letter" for its prostate cancer treatment Provenge.

  • Shares of Biotech drug maker Dendreon sank more than 50% after the FDA requested more clinical data on the effectiveness of its prostate cancer treatment, Provenge, delaying the drug's approval.

  • Alli: Buy the Book Wednesday, 2 May 2007 | 11:47 AM ET

    GlaxoSmithKline's Alli (pronounced "ally" -- don't ask me why they put an "i" at the end) is the new over-the-counter version of prescription Xenical from Roche. It's a diet pill, but as I previously blogged, it has potentially embarrassing side effects. On the plus side, GSK says you can subtract 50% more pounds if you use Alli as directed. But, if you still eat too many fatty foods, you could run into trouble.

  • Glaxo Wins FDA Approval for Allergy Spray Friday, 27 Apr 2007 | 5:44 PM ET

    Analysts have projected peak sales of up to $1 billion a year for the allergy treatment, which is chemically known as fluticasone furoate.

  • Merck's Vioxx Successor Rejected by FDA Friday, 27 Apr 2007 | 4:12 PM ET

    The decision was widely expected, after a panel of FDA advisers two weeks ago voted 20-1 against approving the drug, Arcoxia.

  • Depressed Pooch? Eli Lilly Gets FDA Approval for New Drug Wednesday, 25 Apr 2007 | 11:19 AM ET

    Eli Lilly  announced Wednesday it has received approval from the FDA to market Reconcile, the first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class of antidepressants approved by the FDA for treatment of canine separation anxiety in conjunction with behavior modification training.

  • Mylan Laboratories spacer said U.S. regulators approved its generic version of Sanofi-Aventis' sleeping pill, Ambien, in the 5 mg and 10 mg strengths.

  • First Bird Flu Vaccine Wins FDA Approval Tuesday, 17 Apr 2007 | 2:36 PM ET

    A bird flu vaccine made by Sanofi Aventis is the first to gets federal approval as a stopgap measure against a potential pandemic until more effective vaccines can be developed.

  • Boston Scientific Says Plant Problems Resolved Monday, 16 Apr 2007 | 10:55 AM ET

    Boston Scientific said on Monday it had resolved deficiencies that U.S. regulators had found at a plant that manufactures heart rhythm devices, sending its shares up nearly 7%.

  • Merck's new pain reliever drug Arcoxia, which was proposed as a successor to Vioxx, was rejected by a federal health advisory panel. A Food and Drug Administration drug safety expert earlier told the panel that the drug may increase substantially the risk of stroke and heart attack and is no more effective for pain relief than other medicines in the same class.

  • An analyst sounded a warning note on shares of biotechnology company Dendreon on Monday, which have more than tripled in value since March 30, but the stock continued to rise.

  • Fresh fish is displayed at a New York market.

    The Food and Drug Administration doesn’t have the staff to inspect all food imported to the U.S., raising basic health concerns and forcing consumers to take producers' word that it’s safe, a food expert said.

  • Shares of Dendreon shot up after a panel of FDA advisers voted Provenge is both safe and effective in treating advanced prostate cancer.

  • Shares of Dendreon are up about 250% in pre-market trading after a panel of FDA advisers voted Provenge is both safe and effective in treating advanced prostate cancer.

  • Dendreon Shares Take Off Ahead of FDA Panel Meeting Wednesday, 28 Mar 2007 | 4:07 PM ET

    Shares of pharmaceutical firm Dendreon leaped on Wednesday following a CNBC report about a planned Thursday Food and Drug Administration hearing that could determine the fate of a prostate cancer drug from the company.

  • The Southern California farm that grew the green onions that were first linked to and then cleared in last year's E. coli outbreak has filed a libel lawsuit against Taco Bell. 

  • Cepheid Meningitis Drug Gets Approval from FDA Friday, 16 Mar 2007 | 1:14 PM ET

    The test, called the Xpert EV test, can detect the condition in 2.5 hours compared with other products that can take as long as a week, the FDA said.