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Investment Strategy

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  • Game Plan Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 6:00 PM ET
    Game Plan

    Cramer assesses today's positive action.

  • Stocks End Down for Week Amid Uncertainty Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 5:16 PM ET
    Middle East Turmoil

    Stocks ended off the highs of the day on Friday, and lower for the week, amid a still uncertain global environment rocked by uncertainty in the Middle East and Japan, although bank stocks got a lift as institutions began announcing dividend increases. JPMorgan and Caterpillar rose, while Travelers fell.

  • Stocks Trade Off Highs Before Close Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 3:59 PM ET
    Middle East Turmoil

    Stocks traded off the highs of the day before the close amid a still uncertain global environment rocked by uncertainty in the Middle East and Japan, although bank stocks got a lift as institutions began announcing dividend increases.  JPMorgan and Caterpillar rose, while Travelers fell.

  • Traders Bet on Easing Volatility and Uncertainty Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 2:05 PM ET

    On the surface, there are several pieces of news that can be spun positively today...

  • Banks Raise Dividends as Anticipated Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 12:47 PM ET

    These announcements have been widely anticipated in the analyst community.

  • Consumers Like Mobile Shopping Sites and Apps Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 12:32 PM ET
    iphone_with_money_200.jpg

    The mobile phone as a tool for shopping actually has the potential to bridge traditional retail and digital retail in a way that couldn’t have been otherwise possible.

  • Stocks Pare Gains; Banks Rise, Retail Falls Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 12:17 PM ET
    Middle East Turmoil

    Stocks pared gains as news that fighting in Libya was continuing despite Libya's pronouncement that it was ceasing military operations, although bank stocks got a lift as institutions began announcing dividend increases.  JPMorgan and Caterpillar led the gainers.

  • Bracing for a Choppy Earnings Season Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 11:41 AM ET
    charts_money_140.jpg

    Terrible weather in January, a spike in gasoline prices in February and a devastating earthquake in Japan in March: any of those three factors can bring a hiccup in earnings and taken together it seems more likely than not that they will.

  • Yoshikami: Devastation and Hope in Japan Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 11:06 AM ET
    Fukushima nuclear power plant shown on March 15, 2011 following earthquake and tsunami, Japan, Tokyo Electric Power Co.

    There is no way to underscore the depth of the tragedy we see playing out before us as the potential of a nuclear nightmare of unprecedented proportions unfolds before our eyes. And while it pales in comparison to the human toll, the Japanese economy is also surely facing a period of great challenge.

  • Cisco Dividend an Act of Desperation? Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 11:05 AM ET

    Investors are welcoming the announcement of Cisco's (CSCO) first dividend of 6 cents, which would represent a yield of about 1.4 percent. It's about time: the company is sitting on $40 billion in cash. But here's a major problem...

  • Donovan: 2011 Will Be a Big Year for Mobile Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 10:58 AM ET
    donovan_mark_93.jpg

    Several key trends will shape the growth and trajectory of the mobile market in 2011, making this an exciting year for brands and consumers alike.

  • A man and his sister stand before their broken house, destroyed by the tsunami at Rikuzentakata in Iwate prefecture on March 17, 2011.

    Investors ought to "stay the course" despite all the turmoil in Japan and Middle East, though older investors should be more allocated toward bonds, Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle told CNBC Friday.,

  • Stocks to Watch: Cisco, Nike and More ... Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 10:54 AM ET
    Six in 60

    Here's why you should keep a close eye on these six stocks.

  • A Bullish Options Bet on Honda Amid the Sell-Off Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 10:49 AM ET
    2011 Honda Odyssey

    In the depths of a panic-driven stocks sell-off this week, an options investor was making a big bullish bet on Japanese automaker Honda Motor .

  • Quadruple Witching Friday: What to Expect Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 10:08 AM ET
    Broker works the trading floor at the New York Stock Exchange.

    Friday is Quadruple Witching Day. But with geopolitical events rocking stocks this week, this quarterly event has had less effect on the markets than usual. Quadruple witching is when contracts for stock index futures, stock index options, stock equity options and single stock futures expire. This happens once every quarter, on the third Friday of March, June, September and December, and has also been called "Freaky Friday."

  • Stealth Rally? Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 9:38 AM ET

    Stocks opened higher this morning as the world community is finally moving on Libya. Oil dropped to $101 from $103 when the Libyan Foreign Minister said they were declaring a cease fire. France says strikes are imminent after the U.N. approved a no-fly zone. What's not clear is whether this is too little, too late.  

  • Futures Gain After Libya Declares Ceasefire Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 9:21 AM ET
    Middle East Turmoil

    U.S. stock index futures rose sharply ahead of the open Friday after Libya announced it was ceasing military operations to protect civilians in the wake of United Nation's decision to create a no-fly zone over the country.

  • What's On: Currencies, Japan and American Pessimism Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 7:39 AM ET

    See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Friday's Squawk on the Street.

  • Nikkei Losses to Double: Economist Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 4:10 AM ET

    As the market begins the process of second guessing the G7’s coordinated action to keep the yen lower, High Frequency Economics is warning investors the damage caused by the disaster in Japan is being both understated by the government and underappreciated outside of people in the immediate vicinity.

  • Knee-jerk reactions to catastrophes often fall wide of the mark, Stephen King, chief economist at HSBC told CNBC.