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  • Credit Suisse Wants Fed's Mortgage-Backed Securities Friday, 25 Mar 2011 | 7:05 AM ET
    Credit Suisse

    Credit Suisse has joined the list of banks and investment firms considering a rival bid for the portfolio of mortgage-backed securities that has already drawn a $15.7billion offer from AIG, people familiar with the matter said. The FT reports.

  • Learning to Love the Fear Index Friday, 25 Mar 2011 | 3:20 AM ET

    abstract goes here

  • Spanish Cajas in Talks With Hedge Funds Friday, 25 Mar 2011 | 3:17 AM ET
    Spain

    Some of the world’s largest hedge funds and private equity groups have held talks with Spain’s troubled savings banks as they rush to secure €15 billion ($21.3 billion) in new capital to avoid a state bail-out, Financial Times reports.

  • Scots Incensed at 'Raid' on North Sea Friday, 25 Mar 2011 | 2:59 AM ET
    Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne holds Disraeli's original budget box as he leaves 11 Downing Street for Parliament.

    Scottish politicians accused George Osborne of using North Sea resources to “fuel his Budget”, saying the chancellor had given too little in return for his unexpected £2 billion tax raid on the oil and gas industry, reports the Financial Times.

  • Euro Stocks Set To Shrug Off Portugal at Start Friday, 25 Mar 2011 | 2:03 AM ET

    European stocks are called to follow Asia and open higher on Friday, despite another ratings downgrade for Portugal, this time from Standard & Poor's.

  • Gold, oil and copper prices still have room to increase because of the current turmoil in the Middle East, weak economic data from the United States and strong demand from emerging markets, Michael Widmer, metals strategist at BofA Merrill Lynch Global Research told CNBC.

  • Buying Gold = Shorting Mankind's Wisdom: Analyst Friday, 25 Mar 2011 | 1:43 AM ET
    Gold Bars

    Despite mankind's ability to adapt and invent new materials and make use of new resources, humans seem "hopelessly incapable of learning past wisdom and apparently doomed to repeat past follies," according to Dylan Grice, a research analyst at Societe Generale.

  • Executive Decision: Enbridge Energy CEO     Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 6:15 PM ET

    Enbridge Energy CEO Patrick Daniel discusses pipelines and energy infrastructure, as well as the best ways to move oil around the U.S. and Canada, with Mad Money host Jim Cramer.

  • Analyze This: Why Buy Bonds?     Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 5:22 PM ET

    Rich Volpe, RBS, discusses why investors should consider bonds when stocks seem to be on such a tear. Are governments a threat to the rally? And are fertilizer stocks worth a look or are they stinkers, with CNBC's Melissa Lee and the Fast Money traders.

  • 'Ominous Sign' for Euro Zone Investors: Analyst Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 10:14 AM ET
    Euro coin in front of the giant symbol of the Euro outside the headquarters of the European Central Bank.

    Attempts by Germany to renegotiate the structure of the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) just as markets believed things had been settled at the meeting of euro zone leaders last week are an "ominous sign," Simon Derrick, the head of research at Bank of New York Mellon, wrote in a market note.

  • Thrifty Thursday     Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 9:35 AM ET

    Value investment plays, with Sandy Lincoln, M&I Investment Management and Maury Fertig, Relative Value Partners.

  • Debts Come Home To Roost for Socrates Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 4:40 AM ET
    Portuguese Prime Minister Jose Socrates speaks during a press conference at Sao Bento Palace in Lisbon. Socrates warned his political opponents not to provoke a political crisis over planned austerity measures to solve the country's debt crisis.

    "Crito, we owe a rooster to Asclepius. Please, don't forget to pay the debt." According to Plato, these were the last words of the Greek philosopher Socrates, following his decision to drink poison rather than try and pay off the guards and escape from prison.

  • EU Excels in Turning Victory into Defeat Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 3:04 AM ET
    lisbon portugal

    This was pegged as the summit to end all summits; the end of the euro-zone debt crisis; a clear road map for the future.

  • Europe to Open Up Despite Portugal Woes Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 1:53 AM ET

    European stocks look set to open slightly higher on Thursday despite the resignation of Portugal's prime minister.

  • Shake Off the Negatives     Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 6:00 PM ET

    Mad Money host Jim Cramer says try to avoid the negativity, if you can, and that now's a good time to buy high-growth stocks.

  • Word On the Street     Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 5:00 PM ET

    The day's top business stories, including the resignation of Portuguese Prime Minister Socrates, a drop in the Euro, gold hits a new record and silver hits a 31-year high. Commodity stocks lead the market comeback and Bank of America is denied a request to pay a dividend again, with CNBC's Melissa Lee and the Fast Money traders.

  • Miller: Bullish on Stocks     Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 2:02 PM ET

    The bulls are set to stampede down Wall Street, according to Bill Miller, chairman, chief investment officer & portfolio manager, Legg Mason Capital Management.

  • Salaries at HSBC: Time for a Change? Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 5:57 AM ET
    HSBC’s new leadership team (from left): Group Finance Director, Iain MacKay; Group Chairman, Douglas Flint; and Group Chief Executive, Stuart Gulliver

    HSBC is sounding out its shareholders on a proposed shake-up of its executive pay plans, which could see its top bankers unable to sell their stock until retirement, the Financial Times reports.

  • Fed’s Fisher Bemoans 'Lindsay Lohan' Politics Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 5:26 AM ET
    Richard W. Fisher, president of the Federal Bank of Dallas

    Lawmakers must abandon the habits of 'Lindsay Lohan Congresses' of spending addiction, Richard Fisher, president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, told CNBC.

  • Portugal Playing Politics with EU Money? Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 3:12 AM ET

    Portugal is at a crossroads that will determine whether it needs to go cap in hand to the European Union's rescue fund for support, according to Barclays Capital.