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  • Cerberus Capital Gets FTC Clearance to Buy Chrysler Tuesday, 19 Jun 2007 | 1:44 PM ET

    Federal antitrust regulators have cleared Cerberus Capital Management's $7 billion purchase of Chrysler, people close to the deal said.

  • A debate continues in the Senate over the energy bill that could bring massive changes to the current U.S. energy policy. On “Morning Call,” Christopher Horner, author of “The Politically Incorrect Guide to Global Warming and Environmentalism,” and David Hamilton, director of the Sierra Club’s Global Warming & Energy program, debated which party has the best policy.

  • U.S. Bans Some Cell Phones in Qualcomm Patent Case Friday, 8 Jun 2007 | 11:14 AM ET

    The U.S. International Trade Commission ordered a ban on Thursday of some imported cell phone models containing Qualcomm chips that infringe on a Broadcom patent.

  • U.S. Court Throws Out Indecency Ruling Against Fox Monday, 4 Jun 2007 | 1:46 PM ET

    A U.S. appeals court overruled regulators who decided that expletives uttered on broadcast television violated decency standards, a major victory for TV networks.

  • Regulators postponed a decision Friday on revoking the license of BP's Russian joint venture for a giant gas field, days before President Vladimir Putin heads into a Group of Eight summit amid grumbles about the Kremlin using energy as a political weapon.

  • New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer, who rose to political prominence by uncovering wrongdoing on Wall Street, Tuesday proposed overhauling how the state oversees financial firms to reflect their consolidation.

  • China's former top drug regulator was sentenced to death in an unusually harsh punishment for taking bribes to approve substandard medicines, including an antibiotic blamed for at least 10 deaths.

  • The Federal Reserve will consider whether new regulations could curtail lending practices that have contributed to a rise in mortgage delinquencies, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke said in a letter released on Friday.

  • British Media Regulator to Examine BSkyB Deal Thursday, 24 May 2007 | 12:30 PM ET

    The British government ordered the country's competition watchdog on Thursday to carry out a full inquiry into British Sky Broadcasting's purchase of a significant stake in commercial broadcaster ITV.

  • The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission approved new guidance to help companies comply with what critics say is a burdensome and costly provision of the Sarbanes-Oxley corporate reform law.

  • Experts Split on Gasoline Price-Gouging Bill Wednesday, 23 May 2007 | 3:03 PM ET

    The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday to charge firms and individuals fines and criminal penalties for so-called gasoline price-gouging. On “Power Lunch,” experts debated the bill's benefits to and impact on consumers.

  • The House passed a bill that would give the FTC more authority to probe price profiteering from gasoline and other refined products. Violators would face criminal penalties and fines.  The bill, which the Bush administration has threatened to veto, is meant to prevent gasoline stations from running up prices.

  • $4 Gasoline Good for U.S. -- But Not in Short Term Wednesday, 16 May 2007 | 12:07 PM ET

    Don't be angry if gasoline hits $4 per gallon -- high prices at the pump might be just what America needs, say two "Morning Call" guests. The question, though, is what the short-term impact will be to the U.S. economy. Chris Varvares, president of Macroeconomic Advisers, and David Lazarus, business columnist at the San Francisco Chronicle, joined CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera to share their insights.

  • Shares in coal producer Massey Energy tumbled more than 14% after news that the U.S. government sued the coal producer for thousands of violations of the Clean Water Act.

  • In a Rose Garden announcement, Bush said he wanted to move ahead, pending any separate legislative approaches. The new rules will "cut gasoline consumption and greenhouse gas emissions from motor vehicles," he said.

  • Office Bullies Hurt Bottom Line Friday, 11 May 2007 | 2:40 PM ET

    What happens when the class bully resurfaces at the office? Morale and productivity take the punch, according to a study. Nearly 45% of U.S. workers have toiled for an office bully, according to an Employment Law Alliance survey -- and 12 states are weighing legislation to keep the statistic in check. ... But Stephen Hirschfeld, the CEO of Employment Law Alliance, said on "Morning Call" that legislation isn’t needed.

  • Movie Smoke-Out Debate: Hysteria vs. Health Friday, 11 May 2007 | 2:21 PM ET

    The Motion Picture Association of America announced Thursday that movies that “glamorize” smoking could soon be slapped with an “R” rating. Is the MPAA caving in to special-interest pressure -- and will the push for a Hollywood smoke-out curb smoking? Marc Dann, Ohio state attorney general, and Gary Nolan, spokesman for The Smokers Club, debated the issue on “Morning Call.”

  • In an exclusive interview with CNBC's Maria Bartiromo, Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson said the U.S. needs to remain open to foreign investment to preserve its competitive edge.

  • House Approves Rules on College Lending Wednesday, 9 May 2007 | 1:56 PM ET

    With the student loan industry coming under harsh criticism, the House easily passed a bill aimed at curbing conflicts of interest and corrupt practices in college lending.

  • Fuel Economy Debate: Market vs. Government Tuesday, 8 May 2007 | 4:23 PM ET

    A Senate panel met Tuesday as lawmakers weigh whether the U.S. government should raise fuel efficiency standards. Automakers argue it would be too expensive. Sam Kazman, general counsel with the Competitive Enterprise Institute, and Philip Clapp, president of the National Environmental Trust, debated the issue on “Morning Call.”