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  • Should Hedge Funds Be Able to Take Over Failed Banks? Thursday, 8 Apr 2010 | 6:04 PM ET

    As the financial crisis causes more banks to fail, the cash-strapped FDIC may be forced to back away from its longstanding policy of preventing hedge funds from buying banks.

  • Revealing What's Really Inside a 'Toxic Asset' Wednesday, 7 Apr 2010 | 4:50 PM ET

    CNBC "Fast Money" trader is testing the derivative waters by purchasing a bond containing mortgages from 13 states.

  • Toyota Warned Europe About Pedals Long Before US Wednesday, 7 Apr 2010 | 2:18 PM ET
    Brake and accelerator

    Long before Toyota told U.S. regulators about sticking accelerator pedals, the Japanese automaker warned its distributors throughout Europe about similar problems, documents obtained by The Associated Press show.

  • This Budding Boomlet May Turn Into a Boom Wednesday, 7 Apr 2010 | 12:21 PM ET
    NYSE traders

    The central bank basically sees no inflation at all on the horizon. They’re showing no imminent sign of ending their ultra-easy money for an extended period any time soon. But my message to them and to investors is this: Are you sure about this low-growth recovery?

  • New Battle May Erupt Over High Retirement Fund Fees Wednesday, 7 Apr 2010 | 11:06 AM ET

    A recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling offers investors no help in combatting excessive mutual fund fees. And shareholders advocates say the ruling may spark a new round of litigation.

  • U.S. Court Curbs F.C.C. Authority on Web Traffic Wednesday, 7 Apr 2010 | 10:23 AM ET
    Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski.

    A federal appeals court ruled on Tuesday that regulators had limited power over Web traffic under current law. The decision will allow Internet service companies to block or slow specific sites and charge video sites like YouTube to deliver their content faster to users. THe New York Times reports.

  • Europeans Warned of Toyota Pedals Before US Wednesday, 7 Apr 2010 | 3:42 AM ET
    A Tacoma pickup truck on the lot of a Toyota dealership.

    Long before Toyota told U.S. regulators about sticking accelerator pedals, the Japanese automaker warned its distributors throughout Europe about similar problems, documents obtained by The Associated Press show.

  • LaHood Admits Toyota Fine Not Big Enough Tuesday, 6 Apr 2010 | 2:50 PM ET
    Ray LaHood, the transportation secretary.

    The message from the Secretary of Transportation is clear: If he could, he would fine Toyota more than the proposed $16.4 million the Feds are seeking for the automaker failing to alert the government quickly enough about defective gas pedals.

  • The End of Wall Street and the Fall of a Generation Tuesday, 6 Apr 2010 | 11:23 AM ET

    In exposing the chain of events that led to the market’s collapse (liquidity and capital) and the government’s unprecedented bailout, Lowenstein pieces together the full story of “The End of Wall Street” as we knew it and what he calls, the fall of an entire generation.

  • Feds Slap Toyota With a Fine That Won't Hurt Tuesday, 6 Apr 2010 | 9:56 AM ET
    2010 Toyota Prius

    As I was reporting the announcement of the Department of Transportation's fine against Toyota of $16.4 million, I kept thinking of the star athlete who makes gobs of money and is fined by the commissioner of the league for breaking a rule.

  • Republicans Dispute Course of Financial Overhaul Sunday, 4 Apr 2010 | 6:31 AM ET
    US Capitol Building with cash

    End the public lifeline for large financial institutions, Republicans are demanding as they push back against Democratic efforts to set new rules for the financial industry.

  • Farrell: Some Guidance From The Fed Thursday, 1 Apr 2010 | 8:53 AM ET
    Shopper with Bloomingdales Bags

    At least now we know, thanks to Chicago Fed Chief Evans, that "unusually low for an extended period" means six months and not two years.

  • CDSs Will Come Under Close Scrutiny: EU's Barnier Thursday, 1 Apr 2010 | 8:36 AM ET

    Credit default swaps (CDS) will be looked at closely to ensure transparency but they aren't necessarily going to be banned, EU Financial markets commissioner Michel Barnier told CNBC.

  • Stanford Request for New Lawyers Gets Hearing Wednesday, 31 Mar 2010 | 8:57 AM ET
    Allen Stanford

    The federal judge in accused Ponzi schemer Allen Stanford's criminal case says he wants some answers before agreeing to Stanford's request for yet another new legal team.

  • New Agreement Offers Hope for Allen Stanford Investors Tuesday, 30 Mar 2010 | 4:13 PM ET
    Allen Stanford

    Victims of the alleged $7 billion Allen Stanford Ponzi scheme may get a greater voice in how what's left of their investments will be divvied up.

  • The Tax Attack on America Tuesday, 30 Mar 2010 | 11:26 AM ET
    US Capitol Building with cash

    We are facing an across-the-board tax-hike assault from federal, state, and local sources. This, despite a precarious outlook of a return to long-term economic prosperity after an especially deep and painful recession.

  • CEO Blog: Health IT—Beyond Electronic Health Records Tuesday, 30 Mar 2010 | 9:55 AM ET
    Healthcare coverage and the hastle of forms

    Electronic health records are a good first step, but represent only one aspect of how IT can improve America’s healthcare system by making it seamless and safer, writes Chris Begley, Chairman & CEO, Hospira, Inc.

  • Timothy Geithner

    The financial reform bill is moving closer to guaranteeing two critical functions: that taxpayers will never again have to spend billions to rescue failing banks, and that institutions will never be considered 'too big to fail,' Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner told CNBC.

  • Galleon Group

    A former I.B.M.  senior executive pleaded guilty on Monday to providing confidential information about Advanced Micro Devices  and Lenovo to a friend who was a hedge fund consultant and an alleged participant in a wide-ranging insider trading scheme.

  • The SEC now has more staff with experience with complex financial products in the agency and has more financial crisis-related cases in the works, Mary Schapiro, chairman of SEC, told CNBC Monday.