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Regulations

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  • Exclusive Interview: Rep. Barney Frank Wednesday, 18 Apr 2007 | 1:02 PM ET

    CNBC's Mary Thompson talks to the new House Financial Services Chairman about executive pay, the subprime lending mess, reforming Sarbanes-Oxley and why he understands capitalism "better than some of the conservatives."

  • Choice Vs. Savings: Two Views On Senate Medicare Bill Tuesday, 17 Apr 2007 | 4:06 PM ET

    Should the government be allowed to negotiate Medicare drug prices? Two health-policy experts joined "Power Lunch" to debate whether Federal influence will damage the free market -- or if the current ban on government negotiations hurts the consumer more.

  • If CEO Pay Cap Comes, Let It Come From the Board Monday, 9 Apr 2007 | 4:40 PM ET

    Some pro sports leagues have enacted pay caps to ease fans' concerns. So if a chief executive's compensation strikes investors as too far out of whack, should the corporate world consider the same measure? Charles Elson, director of the Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance at the University of Delaware, votes yea. Contradicting him is Alan Murray, assistant managing editor at The Wall Street Journal. The two stated their cases to CNBC's Erin Burnett.

  • The court, in a 5-4 ruling in its first case on climate change, declared that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are air pollutants under the Clean Air Act.

  • Vodafone Sees $11.1 Billion Indian Deal on Track Wednesday, 28 Mar 2007 | 4:40 AM ET

    Vodafone Group on Wednesday brushed off an Indian newspaper report that government regulators might delay its $11.1 billion planned acquisition of India's fourth-largest mobile phone operator, Hutchison Essar.

  • Britain's telecommunications watchdog ordered mobile phone companies to cut their connection fees to rival services, a long-expected move leading to lower bills for landline users. Hardest hit will be Hutchison Whampoa's British 3G operator 3, which will have to reduce its tariffs by 45%.

  • Legal Experts Split Over Shareholder Pay Say Thursday, 22 Mar 2007 | 1:14 PM ET

    One share, one vote? Not exactly: the fate of millions of shares and the rights of shareholders may be up for grabs, as the U.S. House Financial Services Committee is considering a bill that would give investors final say over CEO compensation. Two experts debated the wisdom of such a bill, on "Morning Call."

  • Economist: Congress Will Only Make Subprime Worse Thursday, 22 Mar 2007 | 12:04 PM ET
    MKM Partners

    Want a recipe for deeper subprime trouble? Add governmental interference, says Michael Darda. The chief economist at MKM Partners joined "Squawk on the Street" to address Thursday's Senate Banking Committee hearings on mortgage lending.

  • U.S. to Approve Virgin America if Changes Made Wednesday, 21 Mar 2007 | 4:08 AM ET

    Virgin America, the low-cost start-up airline with ties to British entrepreneur Richard Branson, will have to ditch its chief executive and restructure its ownership to win final approval to operate, U.S. officials said Tuesday.

  • The federal government's final report on the fatal 2005 explosion at BP's Texas City refinery criticized a key  worker-safety agency for lax oversight and reiterated claims that organizational and safety deficiencies at the British energy company led to the blast.

  • U.K. Media Regulator to Investigate Pay TV Market Tuesday, 20 Mar 2007 | 4:44 AM ET

    Britain's media regulator Ofcom said on Tuesday it would investigate the pay TV industry, dominated by BSKyB, and decide whether the market should be referred for scrutiny by competition regulators.

  • LSE Boss Defends AIM Success Against U.S. Critics - FT Tuesday, 20 Mar 2007 | 3:59 AM ET

    U.S. capital markets should accept that London's Alternative Investment Market (AIM) is not simply attracting company listings due to the hassle of U.S. regulation, the head of the London Stock Exchange said.

  • Walmart

    On Thursday, a Wal-Mart Stores e-mail became public that detailed lease terms for banks that would rent space inside its locations. The "church and state" debate began again: Should the world's No. 1 retailer be allowed to dabble in loans? A banking expert and an ex-Reagan Administration advisor argued the merits and dangers, on "Power Lunch."

  • United States Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson listens to a question following his speech at the Confederation of British Industries annual conference, in London, Tuesday Nov. 28, 2006. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson will host a conference in Washington Tuesday looking at how regulation is affecting U.S. capital markets' competitiveness. The the day-long forum will include some of the biggest names in business, including Warren Buffett, former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, NYSE CEO John Thain and General Electric chairman Jeffrey Immelt (GE owns CNBC).

  • Buffett, Greenspan Differ on Regulation of U.S. Markets Wednesday, 14 Mar 2007 | 9:17 AM ET

    Warren Buffett and Alan Greenspan offered sharply different views on government regulation of U.S. capital markets, reflecting the divisions among many business and government leaders who gathered in Washington for a high-level conference on U.S. competitiveness.

  • Wall Street money managers told a House committee that hedge funds should disclose more to their bankers and improve their risk management but not be subject to mandatory registration, CNBC’s Melissa Lee reported from Capitol Hill.

  • Wall Street may be losing its competitive edge to foreign markets because of increased government regulation, according to some business groups and legal experts.

  • Wall Street is losing its competitive edge to foreign markets because of an increasingly tough regulatory environment, legal experts told CNBC's "Power Lunch."

  • Oxley: Don't Blame SarBox For IPO Drop Friday, 9 Mar 2007 | 2:56 PM ET

    A Republican who backs marketplace regulations might seem paradoxical -- but Michael Oxley, ex-GOP representative, co-authored the sweeping 2002 Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Does the former chairman of the House Financial Services Committee still approve of "SarBox"? He gave his views, on "Power Lunch."

  • A bill that would give shareholders the right to cast non-binding votes on executive pay sparked sharp comments Thursday at a subcommittee hearing in Washington.