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Sarbanes-Oxley

  • Fratto: Regulatory Reform Redux: Be very afraid... Thursday, 26 Feb 2009 | 4:19 PM ET

    float: left;display: inline; font-size:11px; font-face:Arial; border: 1px solid #CCC; line-height:12px; margin-right: 15px; width:100px;/CNBC/Sections/News_And_Analysis/_Blogs/Guest_Blog/__COVER/fratto_t_100_2.jpg110010000truehttp://msnbcmedia.msn.comfalse1Pfalsefalse left/CNBC/Components/Images/spacer.gif1107500lefttruehttp://icnbc.msnbc.msn.comfalsePfalsefalse Tony FrattoFormer White House SpokesmanCongress has been asked to do some very painful and unpopular things in the current crisis — like approving $700 billion financial rescue package — and they'll be asked to do more. And if members of Congress are asked to do something painful, your can be sure they'll find a way to share that pain.

  • Why Surprises Still Lurk After Enron Friday, 29 Feb 2008 | 11:32 AM ET

    It is one thing to have a bank report losses because some of the loans on its balance sheet went bad. It is something else, however, for a bank to report a multibillion-dollar loss from taking some risk that had never been mentioned in its financial statements.

  • Terry McGraw Thursday, 19 Jul 2007 | 4:07 PM ET

    In an exclusive live interview on cnbc.com’s home page, The Business Roundtable chairman talks to CNBC's Liz Claman about global competitiveness, immigration, Sarbanes-Oxley and the new Congress.

  • Sarbox Still Under Scrutiny Thursday, 24 May 2007 | 9:43 AM ET

    The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board is expected to approve revised guidelines for the Sarbanes-Oxley Act today, though its effectiveness in U.S. markets is still debated. The new guidelines will continue to hinder America's competitiveness globally, John Berlau, Economic Policy Fellow at Competitive Enterprise Institute, said on "Squawk Box," though one CEO sees a promising future.

  • The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission approved new guidance to help companies comply with what critics say is a burdensome and costly provision of the Sarbanes-Oxley corporate reform law.

  • In the interview, Mr. Paulson discusses the importance of an open economy in the U.S., the Dubai Ports, Sarbanes-Oxley, taxes, China and global capital markets, among other topics.

  • United States Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson listens to a question following his speech at the Confederation of British Industries annual conference, in London, Tuesday Nov. 28, 2006. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

    Top government and private sector leaders discuss regulation and competitiveness in the post Sarbanes-Oxley era

  • In an exclusive interview at a major conference on the capital markets in Washington D.C. , the Berkshire Hathaway chairman also shares his views on hedge funds, executive compensation and his company’s succession plan.

  • Robert Grady, managing director at the Carlyle Group, told CNBC’s “Morning Call” that Sarbanes-Oxley imposes unreasonable costs on small companies that may delay their decision to go public. But David Ruder, professor of law at Northwestern University and former SEC chairman, disagreed. “I think the internal control provisions under Section 404 are absolutely crucial to the management of and honesty of our businesses,” Ruder said.

  • Rethinking CEO Pay Wednesday, 18 Apr 2007 | 11:34 AM ET

    What many see as outrageous or obscene compensation for chief executive officers is back in the limelight after some high profile pay packages lately. The contrarian view is that there is little or no direct link between pay and performance and coupling the two might be detrimental because CEOs would cut corners to boost their pay, eroding the company’s long-term prospects.

  • Buffett, Greenspan Differ on Regulation of U.S. Markets Wednesday, 14 Mar 2007 | 9:17 AM ET

    Warren Buffett and Alan Greenspan offered sharply different views on government regulation of U.S. capital markets, reflecting the divisions among many business and government leaders who gathered in Washington for a high-level conference on U.S. competitiveness.

  • Wall Street is losing its competitive edge to foreign markets because of an increasingly tough regulatory environment, legal experts told CNBC's "Power Lunch."

  • Oxley: Don't Blame SarBox For IPO Drop Friday, 9 Mar 2007 | 2:56 PM ET

    A Republican who backs marketplace regulations might seem paradoxical -- but Michael Oxley, ex-GOP representative, co-authored the sweeping 2002 Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Does the former chairman of the House Financial Services Committee still approve of "SarBox"? He gave his views, on "Power Lunch."

  • Rethinking CEO Pay Tuesday, 6 Mar 2007 | 10:54 AM ET

    What many see as outrageous or obscene compensation for chief executive officers is back in the limelight after some high profile pay packages lately. The House Financial Services Committee Thursday holds a public hearing on the issue and the hue and cry about greed and abuse is bound to bounce off the walls of Congress.  The contrarian view is that there is little or no direct link between pay and performance and coupling the two might be detrimental because CEOs would cut corners to boost their pay, eroding the company’s long-term prospects.

  • Boards of Directors Coming From New Talent Pool Tuesday, 6 Mar 2007 | 9:35 AM ET

    The composition of the board of directors at major companies is changing and becoming less clubby. On "Squawk Box" CNBC's Mary Thompson says there’s no shortage of candidates to serve on corporate boards, but they’re now drawn from a different talent pool. In 2001, about half board members were active CEOs. Last year, the figure declined to 29%.

  • Rethinking CEO Pay Thursday, 8 Feb 2007 | 9:42 AM ET

    What many see as outrageous or obscene compensation for chief executive officers is back in the limelight after some high profile pay packages lately. The WEF meeting is tackling the issue by asking basic questions: What’s an appropriate level for top managers? Who defines “appropriate” and how?  Should a CEO’s pay be linked to the company’s performance? The contrarian view is that there is little or no direct link between pay and performance and coupling the two might be detrimental because CEOs would cut corners to boost their pay, eroding the company’s long-term prospects. (More)

  • Gov't Probes: "Knee Jerk React" or Kick in the Pants? Friday, 26 Jan 2007 | 11:54 AM ET

    KB Home is joining what's becoming a long list of companies caught up in the stock back dating issue. The home builder announced that it's under formal investigation by the SEC for improper stock option practices. The company CEO Bruce Karatz resigned (or retired) last fall over the backdating issue. Right now--more than two hundred companies are under a similar microscope (including computer giant Apple).

  • Rethinking CEO Pay Thursday, 25 Jan 2007 | 4:17 PM ET

    What many see as outrageous or obscene compensation for chief executive officers is back in the limelight after some high profile pay packages lately. The WEF meeting is tackling the issue by asking basic questions: What’s an appropriate level for top managers? Who defines “appropriate” and how?  Should a CEO’s pay be linked to the company’s performance? The contrarian view is that there is little or no direct link between pay and performance and coupling the two might be detrimental because CEOs would cut corners to boost their pay, eroding the company’s long-term prospects. (More)

  • Frank Quattrone, once the top investment banker in Silicon Valley until he was charged in 2003 with covering up IPO abuses, is planting the seeds of his comeback. Quattrone, who was cleared last year, spoke exclusively with CNBC Senior Correspondent Scott Cohn, his first interview in nearly four years.

  • Does Anyone Like Sarbanes-Oxley? Anyone? Monday, 22 Jan 2007 | 12:12 PM ET

    Sarbanes-Oxley may never work its way into the hearts and minds of Wall Street. The regulation came under attack yet again today (see earlier post on Mayor Michael Bloomberg and NYC's financial services) as a reason New York City and the U.S. are losing their financial edge to cities like London. The complaint is the 2002 law is too much and too costly to obey. And that's driving IPOs, hedge funds and the like...