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  • Harvard’s Endowment Reports a 23% Return Tuesday, 21 Aug 2007 | 4:10 PM ET

    Harvard University’s endowment fund reported a stellar 23% return for the fiscal year ended in June, boosting the size of the nation's largest college endowment to a new high of $34.9 billion.

  • Steve Nash: Dominating in a Game of Giants Tuesday, 14 Aug 2007 | 4:33 PM ET

    If you're looking for a guy with a passion for what he does, look no further than Steve Nash. He's loved the game since he first stepped foot onto the court, and he continues playing the game for what it is -- a game. He's having fun!

  • Michigan Goes Adidas As Nike Runs Out On Big Blue Wednesday, 11 Jul 2007 | 11:16 AM ET

    I never, ever thought I would write that headline. But I just did. The University of Michigan has signed an eight-year deal, worth a $7.5 million a year with the three stripers. Nike bowing out of the game is either an indication that Nike doesn’t think Michigan is what it once was--although football has had three 10+ win seasons in five years, the basketball team hasn’t made it to the title game in 14 years and hasn’t even made the NCAA Tournament in nine years. Or

  • Sandy Weill.

    Sandy Weill, former Citigroup chairman, told CNBC that philanthropy isn’t just about money.In an interview with CNBC's Mary Thompson, Weill said giving is about your talent and passion. He urged others to start giving when they’re young and before they have money. He said it’s important to give of your intelligence, energy and passion.

  • Charitable Gifts Get Bigger as Wall Street's Profits Soar Wednesday, 13 Jun 2007 | 2:59 PM ET

    Philanthropy--once the province of "old money," or those who inherited their wealth--is increasingly being led by self-made millionaires and billionaires, according to CNBC's Mary Thompson. And the size of gifts is getting bigger as Wall Street’s profits rise.

  • A U.S. District Judge might have denied NASCAR's request to stay an injunction that allowed the Cingular logo on Jeff Burton's car to be replaced with an AT&T logo, but NASCAR got a victory yesterday when Alltel agreed to a $25 billion private equity buyout. Let's go back and put this in context for you. NASCAR obviously did not want the AT&T brand on the track because it wasn't one of the brands that were grandfathered in when the governing body signed a 10-year, $700 million deal with Nextel to be the official telecommunications company of NASCAR. But consolidation in this industry is very common -- Sprint soon bought Nextel and AT&T bought Cingular.

  • Monday SportsBiz Roundup Monday, 21 May 2007 | 11:11 AM ET

    Tomorrow is the NBA Draft Lottery. It is designed to give teams who had a bad season a better future and turn their fortunes around, thus giving their fans hope. It is designed to make sure the league doesn't have the same teams competing for the championship every year. Well, despite the fact that LeBron James has Cleveland in the Eastern Conference Finals, the lottery apparently isn't doing enough. I don't know how you define parity, but I define it as 'amount of teams that win championships in a certain period of time.'This is the first paragraph/short story.

  • "Street Sense", Kentucky Derby winner

    I was shocked when I saw the number: $25,008. That's how much Oregon's new athletic director Pat Kilkenny is getting paid to work. Fine. Kilkenny is apparently a guy that just cashed out of his insurance agency, but even if I had millions, there's no way I'd work for that -- especially with Phil Knight being the biggest booster at the place. This whole thing got me thinking that it's probably a good time to look at the salaries of athletic directors since you've all seen the college football and basketball coach salary stats a million times.

  • House Approves Rules on College Lending Wednesday, 9 May 2007 | 1:56 PM ET

    With the student loan industry coming under harsh criticism, the House easily passed a bill aimed at curbing conflicts of interest and corrupt practices in college lending.

  • Adieu Adu, All-You-Can-Eat Future & Heir Jordan Monday, 23 Apr 2007 | 9:49 PM ET
    Freddy Adu

    I have to admit it: I want to be first -- the first to call Freddy Adu a failure. A little more than two months before his 18th birthday, it's time to call it as it is. Freddy Adu is not even close to being among the top 100 relevant athletes in the sporting world today and in fact is not among the top 100 soccer players in the world. But the way people were talking about him when he was introduced to the world in Nov. 2003, you would have thought he would have captured at least a nation that hates soccer by now.

  • Greg Tuza looked around his ACC Conference Store in Greensboro on Friday morning and responded to a caller who asked what he had left of Virginia Tech items. "No polos. Nope. No logo pins. No face tattoos. No, no decals. We won't have hats for two weeks." Pretty much all that was left in his ransacked store was Virginia Tech golf towels and baby rattles. There were 394 Hokies t-shirts in his shop yesterday. All gone.

  • VT Media Frenzy, Nike Hits Imus & Redstone Donation Friday, 20 Apr 2007 | 11:58 AM ET

    This week the media was dominated by the Virginia Tech killings, and Web traffic reflected the public's obsession. Facebook, the social networking site that's refusing to sell -- even as its valuation nears $1 billion -- got a boost. Traffic to the Virginia Tech Facebook website increased 555% on Monday, April 16 over the previous day.

  • Gunman In Shooting Rampage Was A Virginia Tech Student Tuesday, 17 Apr 2007 | 12:56 PM ET
    In this undated photo released by the Virginia State Police, Cho Seung-Hui is shown. Seung-Hui, 23, of South Korea, is identified by police as the gunman suspected in the massacre that left 33 people dead at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., Monday, April 16, 2007, the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history. (AP Photo/Virginia State Police)

    A Virginia Tech senior from South Korea killed at least 30 people locked inside a classroom building in the deadliest shooting rampage in modern U.S. history, the university and police said.

  • Kluge to Give up to $600 Million to Columbia University Wednesday, 11 Apr 2007 | 2:58 AM ET

    Media mogul John W. Kluge plans to give at least $400 million and up to $600 million to Columbia University, a source familiar with the donation told WNBC late Tuesday.

  • Citigroup has agreed to pay $2 million to help educate college-bound students about student loans as part of a wider settlement of a probe into the college loan industry, New York State Attorney General Andrew Cuomo said.

  • New MBA + Private Equity = $400K (Maybe) Wednesday, 17 Jan 2007 | 4:25 PM ET

    Private equity is the hot spot in money these days with groups gobbling up companies left and right and big payoffs for members of the private equity firms. (we've reported on the pros and cons of private equity firms.) So--they are the place to be when it comes to making money, right? Well--business vets need not be bitter about reports that freshly-minted MBAs are making $400,000 per year....

  • Pay Students To Play? Two Critics Say "Nay" Tuesday, 16 Jan 2007 | 1:27 PM ET
    NCAA

    Despite sacred names like Notre Dame, college sports programs are not necessarily pure. Should the undergrad athletes who generate big value for their schools enjoy a share of the hard cash? Two experts voice sympathy for the players – but don’t see salaries as the answer.