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  • The herbicide is approved immediately for use in six states, and the EPA is evaluating expansion to additional states. "EPA has not followed the law," said Greg Loarie, an attorney with Earthjustice, a non-profit environmental law organization that is evaluating legal action to try to stop the commercialization of Enlist Duo. Loarie said EPA also failed to fully...

  • BEIJING/ SHANGHAI, Oct 16- Chinese companies are on a pace to cut capital spending by around 7 percent this year, the biggest annual reduction since the global financial crisis, deepening an economic chill. The cutbacks could persist, indicating that China's economy, which has relied heavily on investment, will need to speed up rebalancing to feed growth.

  • In announcing the decision, EPA said it had thoroughly evaluated the risks, including those for endangered species, that come with what is expected to be a large increase in the use of the chemical agent 2,4- D, which is an active ingredient of Enlist Duo. "EPA has not followed the law," said Greg Loarie, an attorney with Earthjustice, a non-profit environmental law...

  • EPA said it was applying "first-time-ever restrictions" on its approval of the herbicide, called Enlist Duo, which is designed to be used with new genetically modified crops developed by Dow AgroSciences, a unit of Dow Chemical. EPA said the approval lays out a template of new requirements for future approvals of herbicides designed for use with genetically...

  • EPA approves new weed killer for engineered crops Wednesday, 15 Oct 2014 | 12:00 PM ET

    The EPA said Wednesday that it will allow the use of a 2,4- D weed killer called Enlist Duo, a new version of the popular herbicide used since the 1940 s. The EPA said in a release that the agency's decision reflects a large body of science and that officials used "highly conservative and protective assumptions to evaluate human health and ecological risks."

  • Study: Lake Erie vulnerable to bacteria blooms Wednesday, 15 Oct 2014 | 11:59 AM ET

    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich.— Climate change and invasive mussels may have made Lake Erie a more inviting host for toxic bacteria in recent years, suggesting that ambitious goals are needed for reducing phosphorus runoff that feeds large blooms like the one that forced a temporary tap water shutdown in and near Toledo, Ohio, scientists said Wednesday.

  • OSLO, Oct 15- Some major customers of Norwegian aluminium maker Norsk Hydro want it to certify metal made with clean hydro power to help a shift from high-polluting fossil fuels and combat climate change, chief executive Svein Richard Brandtzaeg said. The name itself reflects hydro power but they would like us to certificate the hydropower-based metal in...

  • WASHINGTON, Oct 15- Lockheed Martin Corp said on Wednesday it had made a technological breakthrough in developing a power source based on nuclear fusion, and the first reactors, small enough to fit on the back of a truck, could be ready for use in a decade. Tom McGuire, who heads the project, said he and a small team had been working on fusion energy at Lockheed's...

  • You might hope for a sense of realism and practical moves to address the issues, but instead the World Coal Conference in Copenhagen this week was characterised by what seemed like a state of denial. Spot thermal coal at Australia's Newcastle port fell to $64.92 a tonne in the week ended Oct. 10, 1 cent higher than the previous week, which was the lowest since...

  • Lockheed says makes breakthrough on fusion energy project Wednesday, 15 Oct 2014 | 8:30 AM ET

    WASHINGTON, Oct 15- Lockheed Martin Corp said on Wednesday it had made a technological breakthrough in developing a power source based on nuclear fusion, and the first reactors, small enough to fit on the back of a truck, could be ready in a decade. Tom McGuire, who heads the project, said he and a small team had been working on fusion energy at Lockheed's secretive...

  • COLUMN-Oil market proves mightier than OPEC: Kemp Wednesday, 15 Oct 2014 | 8:21 AM ET

    "If the shale revolution can be sustained in the United States, and successfully exported to other countries, some combination of OPEC production cuts or lower oil prices to encourage demand and forestall more investment, will be inevitable by 2015-16," I wrote last year. "The massive rise in prices means Saudi Arabia will face intense competition from shale," I...

  • Paul Simpson, CEO and co-founder of CDP, discusses a report that lists leading companies taking steps to cut their carbon footprint and how they are reducing their impact on the environment.

  • Dallas nurses cite sloppy conditions in Ebola care Wednesday, 15 Oct 2014 | 12:21 AM ET

    DALLAS— A Liberian Ebola patient was left in an open area of a Dallas emergency room for hours, and the nurses treating him worked for days without proper protective gear and faced constantly changing protocols, according to a statement released late Tuesday by the largest U.S. nurses' union. Burger convened a conference call with reporters to relay what she said...

  • WASHINGTON, Oct 14- The director of the White House's Office of Management and Budget said action to combat climate change is imperative for fiscal reasons, not just moral reasons, given the mounting costs of climate events on the federal budget. Shaun Donovan, who took the reins at OMB in August, said the Obama administration's pragmatic approach echoed that of...

  • Treasury clears way for oil spill recovery grants Tuesday, 14 Oct 2014 | 4:44 PM ET

    NEW ORLEANS— The U.S. Treasury Department says it has cleared the way for Gulf Coast states and local governments to begin applying for recovery grants through a federal RESTORE Act trust fund containing money from civil penalties in the 2010 BP oil spill. Under rules finalized Tuesday, 35 percent of the Gulf Restoration Trust Fund will be divided equally among...

  • As the U.S. oil boom of the last six years builds an excess of light crude along the Gulf Coast refining hub, calls have risen for Congress and the Obama administration to relax the ban on shipments to global customers. The report was issued by the manufacturing branch of the Aspen Institute, which is supported by energy companies including Exxon Mobil Corp,...

  • *46 percent of CEOs worried about climate change-PwC survey. LONDON, Oct 14- Competition and regulation push companies to take action to protect themselves from the effects of climate change, not climate science, Jon Williams, partner at global consultancy firm PwC told the Reuters Global Climate Change Summit. "More and more businesses are seeing climate...

  • WASHINGTON, Oct 14- Ending a 40- year old ban on U.S. crude oil exports would not raise domestic gasoline prices because it would put more petroleum onto global markets, where fuel prices are primarily set, a study by The Aspen Institute said on Tuesday. As the U.S. oil boom of the last six years builds an excess of light crude along the Gulf Coast refining hub, calls have...

  • *Firm developing world's biggest wind park in North Sea. OSLO, Oct 14- Wind farms will be built more and more in shallow seas, from China to the United States, as the industry imitates oil firms and moves offshore, the head of Europe's largest generator of renewable energy said on Tuesday. The company is a also part of a consortium developing Dogger Bank, the world's...

  • *Voluntary guidelines determine how green a bond is. ZURICH, Oct 14- The integrity of the fast-growing "green bond" market is at risk unless a clear definition of what passes for green can be agreed, Zurich Insurance's investment chief told the Reuters Global Climate Change Summit. The supply of green bonds, a fixed-income security designed to raise capital for...