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  • HOUSTON— In the year since the energy industry last gathered in for its big annual confab in Houston, prices for oil and natural gas took a dive that few, if anyone, saw coming. IHS's Kurt Barrow expects oil prices to maybe climb back to $65 a barrel by the end of the year. Adam Sieminski, administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration, expects oil to average...

  • Clarification: New England Energy story Friday, 24 Apr 2015 | 11:20 AM ET

    HARTFORD, Conn.— In a story April 23 about energy policy, The Associated Press reported that five of New England' s six governors said they would work across the region while each state pursues individual projects. New England governors discuss ways to chop energy prices. HARTFORD, Conn.— New England' s governors agreed Thursday to a mix of regional and state actions...

  • HARTFORD, Conn.— A former shop teacher has sued the high school where he used to work, saying he was fired after pointing out safety violations in its woodshop. Keegan Day of Pomfret was hired in June to teach woodworking at Norwich Free Academy. David Klien, the head of the school said, "You know this is going to cost the school at least $200,000," according to the lawsuit.

  • DETROIT— Federal agricultural officials announced Thursday voluntary programs and initiatives for farmers, ranchers and foresters meant to build on President Barack Obama's efforts to combat global warming— and they don't require congressional approval. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack unveiled the plans at Michigan State University, where Obama...

  • Is dirty air damaging the brains of city dwellers? Friday, 24 Apr 2015 | 7:07 AM ET
    Smog over Beijing, China.

    City air pollution could hurt your brain, Harvard researchers suggested Thursday.

  • TOKYO, April 24- Japan's government has proposed making nuclear energy account for between 20 and 22 percent of the country's electricity mix by 2030, with renewable energy to account for slightly more, media reported on Friday. It will, however, mark a shift away from nuclear power, which contributed to about 30 percent of Japan's electricity supply before the...

  • PORTLAND, Maine— Federal fishery regulators say they will keep much-debated protections for Cashes Ledge in the Gulf of Maine in place as part of a broad effort to alter the scope of New England' s fishing grounds. The decision to preserve Cashes Ledge came as the New England Fishery Management Council debated changes to habitat protections in the Gulf of Maine,...

  • LIMA, Peru— Mourners carried a coffin holding a 61- year-old farmer through the streets of a southern Peru port city Thursday after the man became the first fatality of a monthlong protest against a Mexican-owned copper mining project. Agriculture Minister Juan Manuel Benites, the chief government negotiator in the dispute, said the widening protest against...

  • Correction: Oil Leak-Arkansas story Thursday, 23 Apr 2015 | 4:09 PM ET

    LITTLE ROCK, Ark.— In a story April 22 about a settlement involving an Arkansas oil spill, The Associated Press misspelled the last name of an Exxon Mobil Corp. spokesman. Exxon Mobil firms to pay nearly $5 M for Arkansas oil spill. LITTLE ROCK, Ark.— Two subsidiaries of Exxon Mobil must pay almost $5 million in penalties for state and federal violations involving the...

  • It was a markedly more-confrontational speech to the conference than last year, when McCarthy became the first EPA chief to attend and deftly sought to find common ground with the hundreds of oil, coal and utility executives who attend the annual meeting. The EPA proposed rules last summer designed to slash carbon emissions from power plants.

  • Is that water in the sink a fix for Calif drought? Thursday, 23 Apr 2015 | 2:10 PM ET
    A woman installs a diverter valve for a greywater system at a new home in Los Angeles.

    As California faces a historic drought, more residents are looking to graywater treatment as a solution to reduce water usage.

  • MIT invents system that makes salt water drinkable Thursday, 23 Apr 2015 | 11:53 AM ET
    Weeds grow in dry cracked earth that used to be the bottom of Lake McClure in La Grange, Calif.

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has won a competition to desalinate unusable water and make it drinkable for humans and crops.

  • Trustees stress damage of prolonged pollution on NY river Thursday, 23 Apr 2015 | 10:00 AM ET

    ALBANY, N.Y.— Government trustees assessing damage to the Hudson River from prolonged PCB contamination on Thursday stressed the widespread harm to its fish as a final season of dredging looms. "he public's use of the Hudson River fishery, whether for a livelihood, a source of recreational enjoyment, or for nutrition, has been and continues to be severely...

  • Environmentalists protest theme park's solar farm plan Thursday, 23 Apr 2015 | 6:42 AM ET

    JACKSON, N.J.— Environmentalists upset about a New Jersey theme park's plan to cut down 19,000 trees to build a solar farm staged an Earth Day "hike" near the site where Six Flags Great Adventure wants to build a 90- acre solar farm. Environmental groups, including the New Jersey chapter of the Sierra Club and Save Barnegat Bay, told The Asbury Park Press that the solar...

  • HARTFORD, Conn.— New England' s governors agreed Thursday to a mix of regional and state actions to cut persistently high energy costs. "But if you're going to pursue an all-options approach on something like this, you need to do it on a collaborative basis, working with those who also rely on the same grid we rely on in Massachusetts." In one joint effort, Connecticut,...

  • Q&A: What's listeria and how is it traced to ice cream? Thursday, 23 Apr 2015 | 3:15 AM ET

    WASHINGTON— New technologies account for one way that the government is tracking a life-threatening outbreak of listeria linked to Blue Bell ice cream products. Texas- based Blue Bell Creameries recalled all its products this week after listeria was found in a variety of the company's frozen treats. The massive recall followed several smaller recalls as...

  • Hong Kong's 'name and shame' litter campaign Thursday, 23 Apr 2015 | 1:01 AM ET

    Think twice before you litter in Hong Kong, which has resorted to naming and shaming in an effort to clean up the city on Global Earth day.

  • DETROIT— Federal agricultural officials announced Thursday voluntary programs and initiatives for farmers, ranchers and foresters meant to build on President Barack Obama's efforts to combat global warming— and don't require congressional approval. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack unveiled the plans at Michigan State University, where Obama signed...

  • CDC using new technology to track listeria Illnesses Wednesday, 22 Apr 2015 | 4:27 PM ET

    WASHINGTON— The government is relying on some new technology— as well as a bit of luck— to track an outbreak of life-threatening listeria linked to Blue Bell ice cream products. Texas- based Blue Bell Creameries recalled all its products this week as listeria was found in a variety of the company's frozen treats. "It is giving us a new power to investigate cold cases,"...

  • The GOP lawmakers have tried the two policy "riders" before, but such provisions were stripped under the threat of a veto by the White House. Democrats on the committee also protested spending limits on domestic agency budgets as President Barack Obama's budget office weighed in for the second day in a row about the flaws it sees in the GOP spending plan.