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Environment

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  • As numbers of gray seals rise, so do conflicts Sunday, 20 Jul 2014 | 9:03 AM ET

    ROCKLAND, Maine— Decades after gray seals were all but wiped out in New England waters, the population has rebounded so much that some frustrated residents are calling for a controlled hunt.

  • New Peru law weakens environmental safeguards Sunday, 20 Jul 2014 | 12:02 AM ET

    LIMA, Peru— Dozens of international groups, the United Nations, and even Peru's own citizen ombudsman are objecting to a new law that weakens environmental protections in the Andean nation even as it prepares to host international climate-control talks this year.

  • "The science is clear that mining the Pebble deposit would cause irreversible damage to one of the world's last intact salmon ecosystems," said Dennis McLerran, regional administrator for the EPA, in a statement.

  • WASHINGTON, July 18- The Obama administration on Friday approved a plan that would allow companies to assess oil resources off the Atlantic Coast, angering environmental groups that worried the plan will harm marine life and open the door to offshore drilling.

  • July 18- U.S. environmental regulators laid out proposed protections for Alaska's Bristol Bay watershed on Friday, outlining restrictions that would effectively block the development of the Pebble deposit, which could be one of the world's largest copper mines.

  • California drought: Ground water 'saved our bacon' Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 11:18 AM ET
    Grapevines in Healdsburg, Calif., soak up ground water as Northern California’s Wine Country prepares for the 2014 harvest.

    The drought in California will cost $2.2 billion in 2014, says a new report. Dwindling ground water is keeping food prices low, but not for long.

  • AP NewsBreak: Obama opens East Coast to oil search Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 10:09 AM ET

    The U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management disclosed its final approval first to The Associated Press ahead of an announcement later Friday. The approval opens the outer continental shelf from Delaware to Florida to exploration by energy companies preparing to apply for drilling leases in 2018, when current congressional limits are set to expire.

  • US-EU trade talks sour amid chlorine chicken fears Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 7:25 AM ET

    BRUSSELS— Visions of chlorine-drenched chickens and the prospect of genetically modified "Frankenfood" invading dinner tables across the European Union are proving serious impediments to the signing of a sweeping free trade agreement between the United States and the 28- country bloc.

  • POWRANNA, Australia, July 18- Thousands of Black Angus bulls snort steam gently into the frigid early morning air at Tasmania's largest cattle feedlot as they jostle for space at a long grain trough.

  • Details of court ruling on 2012 gas drilling law Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 | 3:42 PM ET

    Details of Thursday's Commonwealth Court ruling on a lawsuit challenging aspects of a 2012 law that updated Pennsylvania's oil and gas drilling regulations:. —The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission's power to withhold drilling fee revenue from municipalities whose zoning it deems to illegally restrict drilling activity.

  • Court further limits reach of gas drilling law Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 | 12:34 PM ET

    HARRISBURG, Pa.— A Pennsylvania court has further limited the reach of a major 2012 law that modernized drilling regulations, ruling Thursday that state public utility regulators cannot review how local zoning restrictions affect the natural gas industry.

  • 'Peak soil' threatens future global food security Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 | 8:44 AM ET

    *Arable land from China to Sub-Saharan Africa already lost. "We know far more about the amount of oil there is globally and how long those stocks will last than we know about how much soil there is," said John Crawford, Director of the Sustainable Systems Programme in Rothamsted Research in England.

  • WELLINGTON/ LONDON, July 17- The goal of a global carbon market to tackle climate change, once touted to reach $2 trillion by 2020, received a major setback when Australia on Thursday scrapped its planned carbon trading scheme, which would have been the world's third biggest.

  • WELLINGTON/ LONDON, July 17- The goal of a global carbon market to tackle climate change, once touted to reach $2 trillion by 2020, received a major setback when Australia on Thursday scrapped its planned carbon trading scheme, which would have been the world's third biggest.

  • FACTBOX-Carbon trading schemes around the world Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 | 3:12 AM ET

    July 17- The goal of a global carbon market to tackle climate change hit turbulence on Thursday when Australia scrapped its planned carbon trading scheme. Eight new carbon markets have opened since 2013 in countries including the world's top emitters China and the United States.

  • WELLINGTON/ LONDON, July 17- The goal of a global carbon market to tackle climate change, once touted to reach $2 trillion by 2020, received a major setback when Australia on Thursday scrapped its planned carbon trading scheme, which would have been the world's third biggest.

  • Australia repeals maligned 2-year-old carbon tax Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 | 1:31 AM ET

    SYDNEY— Australia's government repealed a much-maligned carbon tax on the nation's worst greenhouse gas polluters on Thursday, ending years of contention over a measure that became political poison for the lawmakers who imposed it.

  • *Australia axes world's second biggest ETS before it starts. *Opposition calls it an "appalling" day for Australia. Australia is one of the world's biggest carbon emitters on a per capita basis and abandoning plans for the world's second largest emissions trading scheme after Europe, set to begin from 2015, is a major setback for global CO2 trading.

  • Australia repeals controversial carbon tax Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 | 9:36 PM ET

    SYDNEY— Australia's government repealed a much-maligned carbon tax on the nation's worst greenhouse gas polluters on Thursday, ending years of contention over a measure that became political poison for the lawmakers who imposed it.

  • Fewer gas leaks found in cities with new pipes Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 | 5:18 PM ET

    WASHINGTON— Cities such as Indianapolis that regularly replace old natural gas lines have significantly fewer leaks than older urban areas where they don't, like Boston and New York City's Staten Island, according to a new study by Google and an environmental group. Boston and Staten Island averaged one leak per each mile mapped.