GO
Loading...

Lawsuits

More

  • 'Hillary: The Movie' Gets New Airing at High Court Wednesday, 9 Sep 2009 | 9:17 AM ET
    Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    "Hillary: The Movie" is returning to the Supreme Court for a limited engagement and with the chance to overhaul laws governing federal campaigns ranging from the White House to the halls of Congress.

  • David Einhorn

    A recent court ruling that forced two ratings companies to defend fraud claims is a "game-changer" for the industry, said David Einhorn, head of Greenlight Capital.

  • Firing Scandal Rocks Secretive Actuary Group Tuesday, 8 Sep 2009 | 2:40 PM ET

    The American Academy of Actuaries, the public face of a behind-the-scenes profession, is in disarray after quietly sacking its incoming president, then trying to conceal both his ouster and an unpleasant secret from his past.

  • Tax Havens Face Global Crackdown: OECD Chief Wednesday, 2 Sep 2009 | 4:50 PM ET

    A global crackdown on bank secrecy and offshore tax havens is gaining steam due to  the worldwide financial crisis, the head of the OECD told CNBC.

  • SEC Says It Botched 5 Madoff Probes, Despite Warnings Wednesday, 2 Sep 2009 | 3:46 PM ET
    Bernie Madoff mugshot

    The watchdog of the Securities and Exchange Commission has found that three agency exams and two investigations of Bernard Madoff's business were incompetent, despite ample warnings of the multibillion-dollar fraud.

  • Accused Fraudster Stanford Has Heart Test Tuesday, 1 Sep 2009 | 10:26 AM ET
    Allen Stanford

    A lawyer for Texas billionaire R. Allen Stanford says his client has had a medical procedure that allows doctors to diagnose and treat certain heart conditions.

  • Dozens of Advisors Added to Stanford Suit Monday, 31 Aug 2009 | 9:31 PM ET

    Dozens of financial advisors for the defunct Stanford Financial Group, which sold millions of dollars worth of allegedly fraudulent certificates of deposit to unsuspecting customers, were added to a federal lawsuit by the court-appointed Receiver in the case.

  • Allen Stanford

    Stanford investors are suing five banks, including two in the US, that handled billions of dollars in customer deposits for Stanford International Bank in Antigua, the offshore bank at the heart of the alleged Ponzi scheme.

  • No New Judge in Stanford Case Wednesday, 19 Aug 2009 | 1:25 AM ET

    Late Tuesday, a federal appeals court, without explanation, denied Allen Stanford's petition to remove U.S. District Judge David Hittner from his criminal case.

  • The industry self-regulatory organization that was supposed to police the brokers at the Stanford Financial Group acknowledges it received a tip from an employee in 2003 that the company was running a Ponzi scheme, but did not follow up on it because of the agency's own policy.

  • Stanford Investigators Turn Sights Toward Banks Monday, 17 Aug 2009 | 7:48 PM ET

    Several banks, including two in the U.S., face new scrutiny as investors and regulators try to sort out the alleged Stanford Ponzi scheme, CNBC has learned. At issue: what the banks and regulators knew about massive deposits and withdrawals from Stanford over the years.

  • Stanford 'Wife' Should Face Contempt Charge: Lawyer Friday, 14 Aug 2009 | 4:19 PM ET
    Allen Stanford

    One of Allen Stanford's mistresses—whom the accused fraudster euphemistically refers to as "outside wives"—should be held in contempt of court, according to the court-appointed Receiver in the case.

  • Getting Paid—The Extreme Version Wednesday, 12 Aug 2009 | 11:53 AM ET
    business check

    What to do when your business has been stiffed.

  • Inside G.E., a Little Bit of Enron Friday, 7 Aug 2009 | 10:39 AM ET

    This week General Electric agreed to pay $50 million to settle a suit filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission that said the company fiddled with its books repeatedly early in this decade. In at least one case, that allowed it to preserve its reputation for making the numbers. Some of the details are eerily reminiscent of Enron.

  • Ex-AIG CEO Greenberg Settles Fraud Charges With SEC Thursday, 6 Aug 2009 | 4:53 PM ET
    Maurice "Hank" Greenberg

    The SEC said Thursday that former American International Group CEO Maurice "Hank" Greenberg agreed to pay a $15 million fine to settle fraud charges.

  • Gimme a Job—Or I’ll Sue! Thursday, 6 Aug 2009 | 9:06 AM ET

    You don't have to wait for the Labor Department report on employment. If you want to know the state of the job market, look no further than Trina Thompson. A recent IT grad, Thompson is suing her college because she hasn't found a job yet.

  • SEC's Schapiro: Ban on Flash Trading Will Take Time Wednesday, 5 Aug 2009 | 4:48 PM ET

    A regulatory ban on so-called flash trading, which gives some big brokerage firms a split-second advantage in buying and selling stocks, will take time to implement, Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Mary Schapiro told CNBC.

  • Medical Papers by Ghostwriters Pushed Therapy Wednesday, 5 Aug 2009 | 11:46 AM ET
    Pills

    Newly unveiled court documents show that ghostwriters paid by a pharmaceutical company played a major role in producing 26 scientific papers backing the use of hormone replacement therapy in women, suggesting that the level of hidden industry influence on medical literature is broader than previously known.

  • Stanford Lawyer Quits over Cash Saturday, 1 Aug 2009 | 5:59 PM ET

    Accused fraudster Allen Stanford once claimed a net worth of more than $2 billion. But with all of his assets frozen by a federal judge, he has no funds to pay his high-powered criminal defense lawyer, Dick DeGuerin of Houston.

  • Major Investor in Russia Sees Wide Fraud Scheme Friday, 31 Jul 2009 | 11:30 AM ET
    Russian Flag

    William F. Browder, once the largest foreign investor in the Russian stock market, filed court documents in New York this week contending that other Western investors in Russia had colluded with the authorities to steal hundreds of millions of dollars through tax refunds and then laundered the money through New York banks.