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  • Studies see new risks for cholesterol drug niacin Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 | 5:10 PM ET

    New details from two studies reveal more side effects from niacin, a drug that hundreds of thousands of Americans take for cholesterol problems and general heart health. Some prominent doctors say the drug now seems too risky for routine use. Those details are in this week's New England Journal of Medicine.

  • 300 vials labeled influenza, dengue found at lab Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 | 4:35 PM ET

    "The reasons why these samples went unnoticed for this long is something we're actively trying to understand," said FDA deputy director for biologics Dr.

  • ZURICH, July 16- Roche's experimental drug crenezumab failed to delay a decline in thinking and memory skills in people with Alzheimer's disease, a result likely to bolster a growing belief that drugs need to be given in earlier stages of the disease to show a benefit.

  • Roche Alzheimer's drug fails main goals in mid-stage study Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 | 11:30 AM ET

    ZURICH, July 16- Roche said its experimental Alzheimer's drug failed to meet its main goals in a mid-stage study, a result likely to bolster the belief that drugs need to be given in earlier stages of the disease to slow patients' decline.

  • Genentech Alzheimer's drug misses goals in studies Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 | 11:00 AM ET

    Jeffrey Cummings of the Cleveland Clinic said none of the deaths seemed due to the drug and pneumonia occurred at a rate to be expected in older people. Results were revealed Wednesday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Copenhagen.

  • July 16- Pfizer Inc said a once-weekly dose of its drug, already approved for on-demand treatment of a blood clotting disorder, reduced bleeding rates in patients in a late-stage study.

  • Senate Republicans block bill on contraception Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 | 1:33 AM ET

    Republicans blocked a bill that was designed to override a Supreme Court ruling and ensure access to contraception for women who get their health insurance from companies with religious objections. But Democrats hope the issue has enough life to energize female voters in the fall, when Republicans are threatening to take control of the Senate.

  • DAPU, China, July 16- After a test showed farmer Zhao Heping's toddler grandson had high levels of lead in his blood two years ago, local officials in China's Hunan province offered the child medicine, he says- and milk.

  • Next global epidemic?     Tuesday, 15 Jul 2014 | 1:40 PM ET

    CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports which biotech companies are working on what analysts say could be the next big biotech catalyst known as NASH, or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  • Deadly Ebola virus spreads—and so do fears Tuesday, 15 Jul 2014 | 11:12 AM ET
    Government health workers administer blood tests to check for the Ebola virus in Kenema, Sierra Leone, June 25, 2014.

    Hundreds have died in West Africa from the Ebola virus. With no known cure and a high mortality rate, alarm is real.

  • Millennials embrace alternative medicine Tuesday, 15 Jul 2014 | 10:34 AM ET

    Most millennials use alternative medicine to maintain wellbeing rather than cure existing sicknesses. The Fiscal Times reports.

  • July 15- Johnson& Johnson reported higher-than-expected quarterly revenue and earnings, benefiting from strong sales of its Olysio treatment for hepatitis C. Sales jumped 9.1 percent to $19.5 billion, beating Wall Street expectations of $18.99 billion.

  • Study: US Alzheimer's rate seems to be dropping Tuesday, 15 Jul 2014 | 2:31 AM ET

    The rate of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias is falling in the United States and some other rich countries— good news about an epidemic that is still growing simply because more people are living to an old age, new studies show. Dementia rates also are down in Germany, a study there found.

  • Common sunflower disease found in the Dakotas Tuesday, 15 Jul 2014 | 2:02 AM ET

    BISMARCK, N.D.— The National Sunflower Association says a common sunflower disease has been found in fields across the Dakotas after a wet planting season. The group says downy mildew was been found in about two-thirds of fields surveyed over the last two weeks in North Dakota and South Dakota. About 70 fields were surveyed.

  • CONAKRY, Guinea/ KENEMA, Sierra Leone, July 13- G overnments and health agencies trying to contain the world's deadliest ever Ebola epidemic in West Africa fear the contagion could be worse than reported because suspicious locals are chasing away health workers and shunning treatment.

  • The fight against Alzheimer's     Friday, 11 Jul 2014 | 1:06 PM ET

    CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports there are currently 67 medicines in development for Alzheimer's, with the biggest players in the space including Eli Lilly, Roche/Genentech and Biogen.

  • FDA weighs cancer risk of fibroid removal devices Friday, 11 Jul 2014 | 12:27 PM ET

    The panel of Food and Drug Administration experts also said Friday that women who do undergo the procedure should sign a written consent form stating they understand the serious risks of laparoscopic power morcellation, in which electronic tools are used to grind tissue and remove it through a small incision in the abdomen.

  • July 11- Two members of the U.S. Senate Finance Committee, including Chairman Ron Wyden, on Friday asked Gilead Sciences Inc to defend the more than $80,000 cost of its breakthrough treatment for hepatitis C, citing the expense to federal healthcare programs.

  • July 11- Two members of the U.S. Senate Finance Committee, including Chairman Ron Wyden, on Friday asked Gilead Sciences Inc to defend the more than $80,000 cost of its breakthrough new treatment for hepatitis C, citing the expense to federal healthcare programs.

  • Sanofi dengue vaccine promising but questions remain Thursday, 10 Jul 2014 | 7:01 PM ET

    PARIS, July 11- The first vaccine against dengue fever, from France's Sanofi, provided moderate protection in a large clinical study, but questions remain as to how well it can help fight the world's fastest-growing tropical disease.