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Executive Compensation

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  • Today's Trivia Questions For Bonus Bucks Friday, 27 Apr 2007 | 11:06 AM ET

    Here's the day's trivia questions for Bonus Bucks. The video question is worth $2,000 Bonus Bucks: Currently, how many $1 Million homes are there on the market in Rockville, MD? Your selection of answers is: 38 or 18 or 24 or 32 And the news question is worth $1,000 Bonus Bucks: AT&T's CEO Edward Whitacre Jr. is set to retire. His pension plan will be worth more than how much? Your selection of answers is: $158.5 Million or $220 Million or $280 Million or $305 Million.

  • Barney Frank: "Say on Pay" Bill Won't Hurt Companies Friday, 20 Apr 2007 | 10:14 AM ET

    Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass. and chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” that a bill requiring companies to hold advisory votes on executive pay is a “moderate” piece of legislation and would cause no harm.

  • Is executive pay the government's business? Wednesday, 18 Apr 2007 | 9:24 AM ET
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    The House of Representatives Wednesday is likely to vote on a bill that will have an indirect effect on executive pay. The proposed legislation, known as the Shareholder Vote on Executive Compensation Act, is being spearheaded by Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass), who is also chairman of the powerful House Financial Services Committee.

  • Apple CEO Jobs Gets Another $1 in Salary Monday, 16 Apr 2007 | 11:23 AM ET
    Apple CEO, Steve Jobs

    Apple CEO Steve Jobs received a salary of $1 last year, which is unchanged from his 2004 and 2005 salary, according to a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission

  • CNBC's Thompson: CEO Pay Adds Confusion to Proxies Wednesday, 11 Apr 2007 | 11:34 AM ET

    The SEC’s campaign to ensure more disclosure of executive pay seems to be bringing more confusion than clarity this proxy season, CNBC's Mary Thompson reports. The new Compensation, Discussion and Analysis (CD&A) section, which averages about 5,000 words or nine pages, is meant to help shareholders. But experts say sifting through the new data is challenging and investors still don’t get all the information they need.

  • At Morgan Stanley, which held its annual meeting in Purchase, N.Y., 37% of shares were voted in favor of "say on pay." The proposal fared better at Bank of New York, where 47.3% supported the measure.

  • If CEO Pay Cap Comes, Let It Come From the Board Monday, 9 Apr 2007 | 4:40 PM ET

    Some pro sports leagues have enacted pay caps to ease fans' concerns. So if a chief executive's compensation strikes investors as too far out of whack, should the corporate world consider the same measure? Charles Elson, director of the Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance at the University of Delaware, votes yea. Contradicting him is Alan Murray, assistant managing editor at The Wall Street Journal. The two stated their cases to CNBC's Erin Burnett.

  • AFL-CIO to Target Verizon Over Executive Pay Monday, 9 Apr 2007 | 3:57 PM ET

    The AFL-CIO, the largest U.S. union federation, is targeting Verizon Communications in a campaign against high executive pay, and will vote against the company's compensation committee at the company's May 3 annual meeting.

  • Great Homes, Bad Stocks Monday, 9 Apr 2007 | 10:40 AM ET

    A new study of CEO homes shows a connection between the size of the home and the company's stock performance.  In this case more means less for shareholders.

  • At KB Home's annual meeting on Friday, the preliminary tally showed shareholders approved two proposals management had opposed. This is unusual as shareholder proposals rarely receive a majority of votes.

  • Ford Motor, which posted a loss of $12.7 billion last year, said Chief Executive Alan Mulally received $28.18 million compensation in 2006, including an $18.5 million bonus.

  • The median pay for chief executive officers in 2006 rose 9.3% from the prior year, marking the second consecutive year of slowed compensation growth, according to a preliminary survey of CEO compensation released on Monday.

  • Union Group Balks At UAL Executive Compensation Wednesday, 28 Mar 2007 | 8:14 AM ET

    News that Glenn Tilton, chief executive of UAL, earned $39.7 million in 2006 drew an angry protest from workers at UAL's United Airlines on Tuesday, with unions demanding their "fair share."

  • GM Gives Out Stock Bonuses for First time Since 2003 Friday, 23 Mar 2007 | 5:27 AM ET

    For the first time since 2003, General Motors  is giving bonuses in the form of stock to Chairman and Chief Executive Rick Wagoner and other top executives.

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    About 39,000 Delta employees will share $480 million in lump-sum payouts and equity in the company when the nation's third-largest carrier emerges from Chapter 11 protection in May, according to material to be disclosed in a bankruptcy court filing Tuesday.

  • John Antioco has been under pressure from board members, including billionaire investor Carl Icahn, who once called Antioco's $54 million severance package "unconscionable."

  • Chevron Chairman David O'Reilly received a 2006 compensation package valued at $13.5 million for steering the oil company to a record profit while many motorists and politicians were angry about soaring energy prices.

  • Merck's CEO Got $8.04 Million in 2006 Compensation Tuesday, 13 Mar 2007 | 4:40 AM ET

    The chief executive of Merck received compensation the company valued at $8.04 million last year, according to a regulatory filing Monday.

  • A bill that would give shareholders the right to cast non-binding votes on executive pay sparked sharp comments Thursday at a subcommittee hearing in Washington.

  • 'Say On Pay' Bill Discussed In Congressional Committee Thursday, 8 Mar 2007 | 12:44 PM ET
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    Congress is considering a bill that would give shareholders the right to cast non-binding votes on executive pay and "golden parachutes" if the enterprise is sold. Opponents say the measure, HR 1257, would force CEOs to devote more time to meeting with advocacy groups and less time on planning and product development. Supporters say that unless pay is tied to performance, executives have incentive to cook the books.