GO
Loading...

Publishing

More

  • E.W. Scripps to Split into 2 Companies Tuesday, 16 Oct 2007 | 7:55 AM ET

    E.W. Scripps, a television broadcaster and newspaper publisher, said Tuesday it plans to split into two publicly traded companies.

  • TV Firm Belo to Spin Off Newspaper Business Monday, 1 Oct 2007 | 3:18 PM ET

    Belo said Monday it plans to spin off its newspapers -- which have been struggling to keep readers and advertising dollars -- into a new company that will operate separately from its 20 television stations.

  • Harry Potter publisher Bloomsbury Publishing saw first-half sales jump 36.5% as export orders for the seventh Harry Potter book and 34 international bestsellers kept bookworms flocking to stores.

  • Copyright Claims Hit Bertelsmann Results; Sales Slip Tuesday, 4 Sep 2007 | 5:37 AM ET

    German media group Bertelsmann, the purveyor of books, CDs and other entertainment, lost 51 million euros ($69.52 million) in the first half of 2006 after costs related to settling copyright claims that arose from its backing of file-sharing service Napster eroded its overall results, it said Tuesday.

  • Tribune Shareholders Approve $8.2 Billion Zell Buyout Tuesday, 21 Aug 2007 | 11:40 AM ET

    Tribune shareholders on Tuesday approved a proposed $8.2 billion buyout of the newspaper publisher and broadcaster by real estate tycoon Sam Zell.

  • Family & Money: Eight Ways To Build Wealth Tuesday, 31 Jul 2007 | 11:21 AM ET

    From healthcare to real estate to retirement, there are many steps you can take to spend less and save more.

  • As "Harry Potter" fans await the final installment of the popular series, CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo sat down with George Jones, chief executive of Borders Group, on “Closing Bell.” “'Harry Potter' is an important part of our business. It’s not that we make a whole lot of money on each of the books we sell, but it draws a lot of people into the stores and gives us a chance to sell other things and maybe in some cases, reintroduce them to Borders,” said Jones.

  • British Retailer Cuts Potter Price to $10 Friday, 20 Jul 2007 | 4:11 AM ET

    Maybe it should be called "Harry Potter and the Deathly Discounts." British retailer Asda Group said Thursday that it would sell the final installment of the Harry Potter series for just 5 pounds ($10), just over one-fourth of the recommended retail price.

  • Scholastic Profit Rises but Falls Short of Estimates Thursday, 19 Jul 2007 | 10:50 AM ET
    Copies of "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows," published by Scholastic, sit inside an Amazon.com fulfillment center.

    Book publisher Scholastic said Thursday its fiscal fourth-quarter profit climbed 5% on increased international and media, licensing and ad sales, but the result missed Wall Street expectations.

  • Scholastic, which distributes the Harry Potter book series in the United States, said Wednesday it will take legal action against two companies for distributing and selling copies of "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" before it goes on sale July 21.

  • Anglo-Dutch publisher Reed Elsevier is close to a deal to sell its U.S. education arm Harcourt to rival Houghton Mifflin Riverdeep for about $4 billion, people familiar with the situation said on Monday.

  • Last Harry Potter Book Sets Online Pre-Sale Record Monday, 2 Jul 2007 | 9:40 AM ET

    The seventh and final book in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series has become online retailer Amazon's most pre-ordered product, with almost 1.6 million copies bought globally ahead of the book's release on July 21.

  • Warren Buffet: 'Wizard' of Omaha? Friday, 29 Jun 2007 | 5:11 PM ET

    He's best known as the Oracle of Omaha (which makes for a nice alliteration) but the British publisher that's cashed in on the magically profitable Harry Potter series is counting on Warren Buffett to be their new 'Wizard' of Omaha. (Warren the Wizard?)

  • Amazon.com Won't Profit From 'Harry Potter' Friday, 15 Jun 2007 | 4:53 AM ET

    Amazon.com has taken more than a million pre-orders for the final "Harry Potter" book due out in July, but the world's largest Web retailer won't make a profit, Chief Executive Jeff Bezos told shareholders at the company's annual meeting Thursday.

  • Informa Buys Datamonitor for $994 Million Monday, 14 May 2007 | 8:52 AM ET

    Informa, the publisher of Lloyd's List maritime newspaper, said Monday it agreed to buy market intelligence firm Datamonitor for 502 million pounds ($994 million;  737 million euros).

  • Australia's Publishing & Broadcasting said on Tuesday it would split its gaming and media assets into two listed companies, sending its shares up as much as 8.5%.

  • Media stocks are cheap, so some big players in the industry are saying “Let’s make a deal.” This week's flurry of potential media mergers includes such heavyweights as News Corp., Dow Jones, Reuters and Thomson. Analysts say that the main driver behind the proposed combinations is that media stocks are relatively cheap, making companies ripe for picking.

  • Richard Parsons, Time Warner’s  chief executive officer, told CNBC that there are no plans to sell the company’s AOL division to a private equity firm. “We like the construction of this company,” Parsons said Thursday in a taped interview with Maria Bartiromo.

  • Move over Citizen Kane, billionaires who want to play media tycoon are snapping up big names in the newspaper industry.

  • Red Ink, NYT Changes & Baldwin Blues Wednesday, 25 Apr 2007 | 10:04 AM ET

    On the heels of News Corp doubling the cost of his tabloid, the New York Post -- which is bleeding $70 million dollars annually -- Rupert Murdoch is looking for a plan. The mogul is gathering his top news executives in his Northern California Ranch next week for a three-day confab on how to transition his newspaper empire to the digital age.