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  • Before President Obama leaves for Rio, he'll be reading a letter signed by 20 Governors calling on the President for more energy options.

  • Now's the Time to Put Money in Russia: Strategist Thursday, 17 Mar 2011 | 5:23 AM ET
    Residential homes sit in front of the coal fueled Ferrybridge power station as it generates electricity in Ferrybridge, United Kingdom.

    As governments around the world rethink nuclear power, with fears rife about leaking radiation at Japan’s earthquake-damaged plants, Steen Jacobsen, chief investment officer at Saxo Bank, recommends investors focus on Russia to benefit from its energy potential.

  • Ferrybridge power station

    While oil – and just about everything else but Treasuries -- sold off today in the wake of the Japanese nuclear crisis, oil prices may be poised to surge as demand for 'alternative' energy sources to replace lost nuclear power in Japan ramp up.

  • Chevron Sets Sights on Natural Gas: CEO Monday, 14 Mar 2011 | 6:32 PM ET

    The country’s second largest energy company, Chevron, will increase its natural gas investment this year and cut back on selling fuel globally, John Watson, chairman and CEO, told CNBC Monday.

  • Shares in Tokyo dropped following the deadly March 11 earthquake and tsunami

    Jittery traders sold pretty much everything Monday as the tragedy in Japan roiled global markets, but longer-term investors were looking at the move as a natural pullback likely to create opportunities.

  • What Currencies Will Benefit From High Oil Prices? Monday, 14 Mar 2011 | 1:36 AM ET
    Dollars and Yen

    Oil prices are driven by a supply shock rather than increased demand due to a stronger world economy, so investors in currencies look to "risk" rather than "macro" factors, David Bloom, global head of foreign exchange research at HSBC, wrote in a market note.

  • Tensions Running High in Saudi Arabia Friday, 11 Mar 2011 | 9:06 AM ET

    Tensions are high in Saudi Arabia in expectations of protests akin to the ones that have swept across the Arab World. CNBC's Yousef Gamal El-Din reports.

  • Reports of police firing on protestors in the Saudi Arabian city of Qatif evoke a possible nightmare scenario for the disruption of oil from a country that sits atop the world's largest proven oil reserves.

  • The unrest in the Middle East is coming in waves. The tidal wave it has created at the pump is taking a big bite out of consumers wallets. We hear about our nation's untapped oil reserves but with the "no new wells" policy there is no hope it can be explored.