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  • Agile Investments President J.D. Steinhilber, who invests exclusively in exchange-traded funds, tried to dispel public concern about market volatility and higher stock prices seen as driven by ETFs. “I’ve always viewed ETFs as simply very efficient ways to gain asset class exposure,” he said on “Squawk on the Street.”

  • Share Buybacks Called Bullish Value Sign Friday, 18 May 2007 | 10:20 AM ET

    Share buybacks are seen driving the market rally. But is the record buyback level really a good thing? Jerry Castellini thinks so. The president and CIO of CastleArk Management explained his optimism to "Squawk on the Street" viewers.

  • Energy Picks from a Top-Rated Fund Manager Tuesday, 15 May 2007 | 1:54 PM ET

    As gasoline prices climb, how can investors make money in the energy sector? In Tuesday’s “Best Trade Now” segment, Shawn Reynolds, top-rated fund manager with the Van Eck Global Hard Assets Fund, appeared on “Morning Call” to offer two energy names.

  • U.S. Equities Still 'Great,' Says Investment Chief Monday, 14 May 2007 | 12:13 PM ET

    Ajay Kapur says "10% of the U.S. economy...is slowing down." So why is the chief investment officer of First Horse Capital still so bullish on American equities? He explained his optimism to CNBC's Mark Haines, on "Squawk on the Street."

  • Investment Chief Likes Biggest Companies' Shares Friday, 11 May 2007 | 12:03 PM ET

    Forget the small fry and medium-cap companies: Andy Bishel thinks some of the market's largest names have the richest potential. The CIO of SKBA Capital Management gave "Morning Call" viewers two stock recommendations that may surprise them.

  • Five-Star Fund Manager Names 'Above Average' Firms Friday, 11 May 2007 | 9:54 AM ET

    European markets have "huge opportunities," says Jason Holzer. He's the senior portfolio manager of Vanguard's AIM European Small Company A fund. Rated five stars by Morningstar, AIM has had annualized returns of some 38% since 2002. Holzer joined "Squawk on the Street" to talk about the "very strong" European economies -- and how his fund plays them.

  • William Sorin pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn to one criminal count of conspiracy to commit securities fraud, mail fraud and wire fraud as part of a plea agreement.

  • Investment Chief Names Top Global Stock Picks Thursday, 10 May 2007 | 11:00 AM ET

    What does it mean if corporate earnings are "even better abroad" than in the U.S.? "A great play for investors," according to Keith Wirtz. The president and CIO of Fifth Third Asset Management offered "Squawk on the Street" viewers his outlook on the market -- and his favorite multinational stock picks.

  • The stock market may not be returning double-digit gains -- but Mark Jordahl, chief investment officer at First American Funds, and Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at Harris Private Bank, still believe "investors need to be in the market." The CIOs joined "Closing Bell" to explain why.

  • Portfolio Managers Say It's Time To Buy Stocks Friday, 27 Apr 2007 | 4:33 PM ET

    With the Dow Jones Industrial Average hitting another record, investors are asking: buy or sell? Robert Zagunis, co-portfolio manager at Jensen Investment Management, and Jeff Mortimer, portfolio manager for Schwab Core Equity Funds, gave "Closing Bell" viewers their answer: buy.

  • After 13,000: Strategists Look To Emerging Markets Wednesday, 25 Apr 2007 | 5:04 PM ET

    On “Closing Bell,” Russell Read, chief investment officer of the $225 billion-dollar California Public Employees Retirement System (Calpers) and Christopher Ailman, chief investment officer at the $163 billion-dollar California State Teachers’ Retirement System (Calsters), joined CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo at the Milken Conference with the big-money view on the Dow’s record run.

  • Analysts Divided On Significance of Dow Record Wednesday, 25 Apr 2007 | 4:43 PM ET

    How important is the Dow's 13,000 level? Kevin Cronin, chief investment officer at Putnam Investments, and Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist at Standard & Poor's, debated the question on "Closing Bell."

  • Investment Exec Lauds 'Beat-Down' Tech Stocks Wednesday, 25 Apr 2007 | 10:23 AM ET

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average broke the 13,000 mark for the first time Wednesday. Does this historical high mean investors should fill their portfolios with momentum stocks? Or should they seek higher-quality long-term investments? Lincoln Anderson, chief investment officer at LPL Financial Services, offered his advice to "Squawk on the Street"  viewers.

  • U.S. Trust on Tuesday released the findings of its 2007 Survey of Affluent Americans. This year, those polled had more than $5 million in total investable assets. The survey also included a focus on Americans with more than $25 million in total assets. Paul Napoli, executive vice president of U.S. Trust, appeared on “Squawk on the Street” with more on the study.

  • Sometimes, a single comment can have deep meaning. Or at the very least, be worthy of a full-blown CNBC alert. General Motors Vice Chairman Bob Lutz managed to capture our attention with a single comment: that the “mortgage industry meltdown” is reducing affordability for auto buyers and negatively impacting April sales. As our Phil LeBeau explained when we threw him on the air to talk about this, such comments aren’t necessarily surprising...

  • Is Google King Of The Web? Analysts Disagree Tuesday, 17 Apr 2007 | 2:31 PM ET
    Google Headquarters

    The Internet's ruling triumvirate has a big week: Yahoo! reports quarterly earnings Tuesday, eBay reports on Wednesday and Google on Thursday. What should cyber-stock investors expect? Mark Mahaney, Citigroup's Internet research director, and Scott Kessler, the director of Standard & Poor's information technology research group, gave "Morning Call" their views.

  • The Nasdaq Stock Market  is in talks to buy the Philadelphia Stock Exchange, the Wall Street Journal reports.

  • Backdated Pixar Options Could Cost Disney Millions Tuesday, 10 Apr 2007 | 3:58 PM ET

    The Walt Disney Co. could have to pay up to $33.5 million to rectify improper backdating of stock options that were granted to Pixar employees before Disney bought the company, a regulatory filing states.

  • Coffee For You Sir? Thursday, 5 Apr 2007 | 9:57 PM ET

    Coffee. Fragrant, strong and desirable. Consumption is growing and supply is expected to dwindle in some producer-nations such as Brazil, hurt by dry conditions. The coffee market is big business.

  • Take-Two Interactive Software said it had received a letter from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission saying it was under formal investigation for its stock-options practices.