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    Never mind the meltdown: Two "Morning Call" guests say this past week's stock slide was "pretty normal" -- and it may turn out to be a good year for equities, after all.

  • Banker: Buy Stocks Now -- Before The M&A Surge Monday, 5 Mar 2007 | 11:12 AM ET
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    With so many investors expecting the current downturn in stocks to be short-lived, returning to U.S equity markets before the volatility has reduced could be the best strategy. Robert Weissenstein, chief investment officer for Private Banking Americas at Credit Suisse, certainly thinks there are opportunities to be had -- and the time is now.

  • Analysts: Brokerages Unhurt By Tuesday Meltdown Friday, 2 Mar 2007 | 5:32 PM ET

    Small investors might have gotten burned by Tuesday's market frenzy. But what of the big brokerage houses? Two bond and portfolio managers told CNBC's Maria Bartiromo that they're not worried.

  • Bull Or Bear Time Now? Analysts Sharply Divided Thursday, 1 Mar 2007 | 10:36 AM ET
    People pass the statue of the bull near Wall Street in New York on Jan. 5, 2004, file photo. Artist Arturo Di Modica, who sculpted and owns the famous statue, is selling it to the highest bidder with a catch: it must stay where it is and be donated to the city of New York. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

    There’s no doubt that this week’s global selloff has got investors spooked, but what is definitely open for debate is whether the downturn will grow in to a full-blown recession -- or just mark a healthy and much needed correction. The debate raged, on "Squawk Box."

  • U.S. May Charge Ex-Execs at Broadcom, Apple: WSJ Friday, 16 Feb 2007 | 3:10 AM ET

    Federal prosecutors are strongly considering criminal charges against former executives of Broadcom., Apple, and KLA-Tencor, related to the backdating of stock options, the Wall Street Journal reported on Friday, citing people familiar with the situation.

  • Ex-Monster Executive Pleads Guilty in Options  Case Thursday, 15 Feb 2007 | 4:21 PM ET

    A former senior vice president of the company that runs the Monster job search Web site pleaded guilty Thursday to conspiracy and fraud charges.

  • Federal criminal charges are expected to be announced Thursday against one former executive with Monster Worldwide over backdating of options, according to WNBC's Jonathan Dienst, reporting for CNBC.

  • Ryan Brant, the former chief executive of video game publisher Take-Two Interactive Software, pleaded guilty to criminal charges related to backdating of stock options.

  • Options Backdating Doubts in Pixar Deal: WSJ Friday, 9 Feb 2007 | 3:55 AM ET

    A payment from animation studio Pixar, thought to have been arranged by Steve Jobs, to the film director John Lasseter, is raising concerns that it included improperly backdated stock options, The Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

  • After The Mac-And-Cheese Goes, Buy Altria: Analyst Monday, 5 Feb 2007 | 4:28 PM ET
    Altria

    It's a stock-watcher's cliché to call Altria shares "smoking" -- but don't tell that to Bonnie Herzog. She's a beverage and tobacco analyst at Citigroup, and she says the company formerly known as Philip Morris is, yes, on fire.

  • Apple Says Government Requests Options Documents Friday, 2 Feb 2007 | 7:01 AM ET

    Apple said it hadreceived informal requests from the U.S. government for documents and additional information on its past stock-options practices, according to a regulatory filing Friday.

  • KB Home  said Friday the Securities and Exchange Commission has launched a formal investigation into the homebuilder's stock-option granting practices.

  • Broadcom, a supplier of semiconductor chips used in communication devices, said Tuesday it would record $2.22 billion in non-cash expenses for the years 1998 through 2005 for stock option accounting flaws - nearly triple what it originally estimated last July.

  • CEO Jobs Meeting With Feds: "Scandal" Start Or End? Tuesday, 23 Jan 2007 | 11:55 AM ET
    Apple CEO, Steve Jobs

    The meeting Apple's CEO Steve Jobs had last week with SEC and U.S. Justice Department officials over stock backdating--might not turn out to be much at all--according to CNBC's Jim Goldman. The meeting was reported today by Bloomberg. But Goldman says people he talked to --don't expect anything to come from all this. In fact--it seems even the probe by government officials may just end up "going away."

  • Dump Tech? Strategists Agree – And Disagree Thursday, 18 Jan 2007 | 2:14 PM ET
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    The 21st century’s version of the new economy is facing a tech meltdown. Or is it? Two experts weighed in on technology stocks for “Power Lunch.” Joseph Parnes, president of TechnoMart Investment Advisors, sees opportunity in market danger. He told CNBC’s Bill Griffeth that “institutions, pension funds” that took a beating on....

  • Apple's stock fell on Friday after investors learned that Federal Authorities are investigating a backdated grant of stock options to Apple CEO Steve Jobs that had a false October 2001 date.

  • Former Comverse Exec Settles Options Backdating Case Wednesday, 10 Jan 2007 | 12:48 PM ET

    The former general counsel of software maker Comverse Technology has agreed to pay more than $3 million to settle an options backdating case with the SEC.

  • Apple Options Probe Spotlights Ex-Officials: Paper Tuesday, 2 Jan 2007 | 7:14 AM ET

    The spotlight in Apple Computer stock options investigation is falling on two former company executives, The Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday, citing sources familiar with the matter.

  • Apple Shines In Face Of Options Report Friday, 29 Dec 2006 | 4:18 PM ET

    Shares of Apple Computer rallied about 5% after the company announced it found no misconduct by current management in its investigations of stock-option grants.

  • Analyst: Apple Statement Raises Issues Friday, 29 Dec 2006 | 11:54 AM ET

    Investors still seem to think Apple is worth something. Shares of the computer giant are holding strong so far today--as the company released information saying it found NO misconduct by CEO Steve Jobs in regards to backdating stock options between 1997 and 2001. But--not all is well with Jobs and Apple according to Christopher Whalen. He's senior vice-president at Institutional Risk Analytics.