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  • Market Rally Due to Trader 'Relief': MD     Friday, 7 Oct 2011 | 4:00 AM ET

    Roman Scott, managing director at Calamander Capital, told CNBC why markets have rallied over the last two days. "I think it is relief and exhaustion by traders that Europe finally appears to have woken up and started doing anything - or at least stated they are thinking about starting to do something," he said.

  • Alan Greenspan

    The euro zone will need political unification to save the euro, Alan Greenspan, former chairman of the US Federal Reserve, wrote in an opinion piece in the Financial Times.

  • BOJ Will not Stimulate Japanese Economy     Thursday, 6 Oct 2011 | 11:10 PM ET

    Martin Schulz, senior economist at Fujitsu Research Institute, admits that Japan's economy needs more support but is unlikely to get it.

  • One-on-One with Herman Cain     Thursday, 6 Oct 2011 | 7:18 PM ET

    Herman Cain, republican presidential candidate, defends his decision to enter the race for the White House, and provides insight on what makes him stand out from his political rivals.

  • 'Occupy Wall Street' Spreads to Main Street     Thursday, 6 Oct 2011 | 4:06 PM ET

    CNBC's Courtney Reagan has the story on the Wall Street protests developing swiftly around the globe.

  • Commodities Tomorrow     Thursday, 6 Oct 2011 | 4:00 PM ET

    CNBC's Mary Thompson discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets and looks at where oil and precious metals are likely headed tomorrow.

  • Checking President Obama's E-mail     Thursday, 6 Oct 2011 | 2:27 PM ET

    President Obama is the first president to use e-mail while in office, and now those e-mails may be requested by Congress in connection with the Solyndra investigation. CNBC's Eamon Javers has the details.

  • It must be quite interesting be in Mr. Wen Jiabao’s shoes at the moment. The Premier of the globe’s second largest economy is living in a world that seems to be on the brink of a recession due to sovereign debt crisis in Europe and lack of recovery in the US.

  • EU Leadership Key to Stop US Downturn: CIO     Thursday, 6 Oct 2011 | 3:30 AM ET

    "We do not expect a recession in the United States, but a lot depends on what happens in the Europe. That is obviously pivoted on leadership. We need to see the 17 finance ministers come together in a credible way, and that is really going to be the key indicator for whether the United States can continue with a very slow, but steady, slight recovery," Alex Friedman, CIO at UBS Wealth Management, told CNBC.

  • Investing in Russia     Thursday, 6 Oct 2011 | 2:40 AM ET

    "Putin is the real leader of Russia. He is the father of Russia," Andrei Kostin, chairman and president of VTB Bank, told CNBC, when asked to rate Vladimir Putin's chances of becoming president.

  • Banks Face New European Stress Tests Thursday, 6 Oct 2011 | 1:10 AM ET

    Europe’s top banking regulator has started to re-examine the strength of the region’s banks, modelling a big writedown of all peripheral eurozone sovereign debt, reported the FT.

  • Bank of England Seen Holding Rates; Easing Unlikely Thursday, 6 Oct 2011 | 12:26 AM ET
    Governor of the Bank of England Mervyn King

    The UK’s central bank, the Bank of England, is expected to hold interest rates at their current level of 0.5 percent on Thursday as the global economic crisis appeared to worsen and the International Monetary Fund warned that a second global recession could not be ruled out.

  • McConnell & Cantor One-on-One with Kudlow     Wednesday, 5 Oct 2011 | 7:00 PM ET

    A wide-ranging discussion on the "millionaire tax", China trade; and creating jobs, with Sen. Mitch McConnell, (R-KY), who says the U.S. is not going to get out of its economic slump with government spending money, and Rep. Eric Cantor, (R-VA) defends his position on the jobs bills.

  • Commodities Tomorrow     Wednesday, 5 Oct 2011 | 4:00 PM ET

    CNBC's Sharon Epperson discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets and looks at where oil and precious metals are likely headed tomorrow.

  • A report from the state treasurer says the Golden State's debt burden is up to 7.8 percent, more than double what it was eight years ago. According to the report, each Californian owes $2,542 this year for state debt, more than twice the national median of $1,066. It could be worse.

  • Our Austerity Plan Will Work: UK Prime Minister Wednesday, 5 Oct 2011 | 11:28 AM ET
    David Cameron

    The British Prime Minister David Cameron defended the coalition government’s austerity plans on Wednesday telling delegates at the Conservative party’s annual conference in Manchester: “Our plan is right, and our plan will work.”

  • Boomerang

    Michael Lewis, acclaimed author of "Moneyball", "The Big Short", "The Blind Side", "The New, New Thing" and the iconic "Liar's Poker" is now out with his latest book, "Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World" - an illuminating look at the global financial meltdown.

  • Protestors on Wall Street, October 3, 2011.

    There is a reason the Occupy Wall Street movement has taken root so quickly and spread far and wide so rapidly – people are fed up. We are sick of shouldering the burden of an economic crisis caused by a few. We are tired of watching the wealthiest 1% receive tax cuts, while the rest of us face job cuts, pay cuts and cuts in vital services. And we are ready to do something about it.

  • Investor Takes a Swipe at Bank of France Governor Wednesday, 5 Oct 2011 | 9:47 AM ET

    Bank of France Governor Christian Noyer has been met with skepticism over her insistence on Wednesday that French banks are generally in good health and that the French central bank — as well as Belgium's — would back troubled lender Dexia in order to ensure it has enough liquidity.

  • What Does Osborne’s 'Credit-Easing' Really Mean? Wednesday, 5 Oct 2011 | 9:39 AM ET
    Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne holds Disraeli's original budget box as he leaves 11 Downing Street for Parliament.

    When chancellor of the exchequer, George Osborne, got up to speak at the Conservative party conference on Monday, he knew he had to tread a fine line between optimism that the British economy could recover and wasn’t going to fall into a "double-dip" recession, versus facing down calls from the Liberal Democrats to ease public spending cuts and those on the right of his own political party calling for an end to the 50p tax rate at the very least.