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  • Don't Bet on 'Bernanke Put': Analyst Friday, 26 Aug 2011 | 8:19 AM ET
    Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke

    Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is unlikely to announce a third round of quantitative easing in his Jackson Hole speech this afternoon, Tony Fratto, the director of Hamilton Place Strategies, a public policy research firm, told CNBC.

  • Wadhwa: Merkel's Grip on the Throne Shaky Friday, 26 Aug 2011 | 7:04 AM ET
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel

    Forbes Magazine might have just put German Chancellor Angela Merkel on the throne for the "Most Powerful Woman" in the world, but at home her less exulted throne of government is shaking.

  • Don't Bet on 'Bernanke Put': Analyst     Friday, 26 Aug 2011 | 5:40 AM ET

    Bernanke is unlikely to announce a third round of quantitative easing in his Jackson Hole speech this afternoon, Tony Fratto, the director of Hamilton Place Strategies, a public policy research firm, told CNBC. "If investors are betting on a Bernanke put, they are setting themselves up for a disappointment. Bernanke hinted at QE3 last year, but I don't think we are going to see that kind of activity today," Fratto said.

  • No Bernanke Sell-Off: Citywire Editor     Friday, 26 Aug 2011 | 5:00 AM ET

    "I wouldn't be surprised to see some selling today based on no news [about QE3 from Jackson Hole], but I don't think it will be a big sell-off," Charlie Parker, investment editor at Citywire, told CNBC.

  • Noda Gets My Vote for PM: Japan Economist     Friday, 26 Aug 2011 | 4:40 AM ET

    "My favourite candidate [to replace Naoto Kan as Prime Minister] is Yoshiko Noda, the finance minister, but as to who is most likely, that is still very hard to tell," Takuji Okubo, chief Japan economist at Societe Generale, told CNBC.

  • Cat And Mouse Game In Europe: Analyst Friday, 26 Aug 2011 | 4:04 AM ET

    Germany is playing a cat and mouse game with less successful European economies as negotiations over the euro zone crisis continue at the country level, Giles Keating, head of research at Credit Suisse, told CNBC Friday.

  • "Bernanke will set out the possible action the Fed could take if things get worse. The problem is that while I am sure Bernanke would like to do more in the way of quantative easing, it seems he does not have enough support within the Fed and within political circles," Robert Prior-Wandesforde, head of India and South East Asia economics at Credit Suisse, told CNBC.

  • QE3 Is Coming by Year End: Roubini Thursday, 25 Aug 2011 | 5:49 PM ET
    Nouriel Roubini guest hosts Squawk Box on CNBC.

    Whether or not Bernanke announces a third round of quantitative easing on Friday, it's definitely coming by the end of the year, economist Nouriel Roubini told CNBC.

  • Commodities Tomorrow     Thursday, 25 Aug 2011 | 4:00 PM ET

    CNBC's Sharon Epperson discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets and looks at where oil and precious metals are likely headed tomorrow.

  • Fears Over Greek Bailout Re-Emerge     Thursday, 25 Aug 2011 | 11:10 AM ET

    Chris Wheeler, bank analyst at Mediobanca joined CNBC to discuss the latest news on the European markets and what would happen if the Greek bailout fails.

  • Greece Has Been Cut Loose By The Markets     Thursday, 25 Aug 2011 | 11:00 AM ET

    "Greece has most definitely been cut loose by the markets, the question is whether it will now be cut loose by the politicians," Steve Barrow, head of G10 research at Standard Bank, told CNBC.

  • ND Gov: Oil Boom Just Beginning Wednesday, 24 Aug 2011 | 6:28 PM ET

    ND Gov. Jack Dalrymple sits down with Cramer to talk about the Bakken shale and the wealth of jobs available in the state.

  • Starbucks' Call to Action     Wednesday, 24 Aug 2011 | 4:33 PM ET

    Discussing political donations and lower coffee prices, with Howard Schultz, Starbucks chairman/CEO.

  • Commodities Tomorrow     Wednesday, 24 Aug 2011 | 4:00 PM ET

    CNBC's Sharon Epperson discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets and looks at where oil and precious metals are likely headed tomorrow.

  • Forget Ben, the Big Draw May Be the IMF's Lagarde Wednesday, 24 Aug 2011 | 1:29 PM ET
    French finance minister Christine Lagarde is seen as a front-runner to succeed Strauss-Kahn.

    While markets are hyper-focused on the Friday speech at Jackson Hole by Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke, they are overlooking what could be an equally important Saturday appearance by IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde.

  • States' Bottom Line Improves, But Can the Good News Last? Wednesday, 24 Aug 2011 | 12:36 PM ET

    This year, many states are receiving their first bit of good economic news since the beginning of the recession. More than half of them will take in more revenue than they expected, and a handful are reporting surpluses, according to one study. Several other reports point to the same trend: states' 2011 budgets heading in the right direction as tax collections increase.

  • Busch: Friday's Trade Wednesday, 24 Aug 2011 | 10:55 AM ET

    We know that Bernanke & Co. have been actively trying to downplay any talk of QE3 and today's WaPo article "Ben Bernanke unlikely to announce big new plans at Jackson Hole is a fine example of this "leaking" process.

  • France's Sarkozy in Talks on More Fiscal Austerity Wednesday, 24 Aug 2011 | 6:47 AM ET
    French President Nicholas Sarkozy

    French President Nicolas Sarkozy is due to meet with Prime Minister Francois Fillon, Finance Minister Francois Baroin and Budget Minister Valerie Pecresse on Wednesday morning to decide where to slash the national budget.

  • Libya to Resume Oil Production, Markets Eye Jackson Hole Wednesday, 24 Aug 2011 | 2:52 AM ET
    Libyan rebel fighters gather on the outskirts of Ajdabiya prior to a failed attempt to take the town from Mforces.

    Post-Gaddafi Libya could begin pumping oil in the next few months, as rebels secured oil infrastructure around Tripoli and edged closer to taking complete control of the country. However, oil markets are shifting their attention to concerns that the US might undertake further fiscal stimulus.

  • "In terms of global competitiveness what you see is the US has gained leaps and bounds versus Europe. Now, clearly emerging markets are still very competitive on an absolute cost and wage basis, they are still the leaders. However, once you add logistic costs and other associated costs the US is still very competitive at this point," Virginie Maisonneuve, head of multi-regional equities at Schroders. "You are seeing companies like Volkswagen going into places like Tennessee and getting cost on an hourly basis of $17 to $18 an hour, remember the likes of GM were firing at a cost of around $90 an hour so very much competitive."