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  • The crazy volatility of recent days strikes me as a market that is topping itself and is struggling. I'm still guessing we have a bit of a pull-back.

  • Broke Town, USA Friday, 4 Mar 2011 | 10:22 AM ET
    Vallejo, California

    Vallejo, a city about 25 miles north of San Francisco, offers a sneak preview of what could be the latest version of economic disaster. The New York Times reports.

  • Libyans shout slogans against Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi while holding a cartoon depicting Kadhafi being hit with a hammer symbolising 'the people's will'.

    One of the most enduring and successful figures in British public life has resigned as director of the London School of Economics, after new details emerged of the institution’s relationship with Libya. The FT reports.

  • My Interview with Rep. Ron Paul Thursday, 3 Mar 2011 | 11:53 AM ET
    Ron Paul

    Congressman Ron Paul (R-TX) chairs the House Financial Services Subcommittee, which oversees the Federal Reserve.  I interviewed him last night on CNBC’s “The Kudlow Report”.

  • A gigantic post-panamax vessel

    As the centennial of its opening nears, the Panama Canal is due to shake up international trade once more, a point rails and ports across the United States readily acknowledge.

  • Stocks Snap 3-Week Winning Streak Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 4:58 PM ET

    Stocks broke three consecutive sessions of losses to end higher amid light volume, led by financial and tech stocks, and as oil prices stabilized.  Intel rose, while Microsoft fell.

  • Stocks Higher, But on Pace To Fall for the Week Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 4:00 PM ET

    Stocks broke three consecutive sessions of losses to climb higher, led by the technology and financial stocks, as oil prices stabilized at lower levels. Boeing fell, while Wal-Mart rose.

  • Stocks Gain, Led by Tech; AIG Sinks Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 11:36 AM ET

    Stocks came off the highs of the session but still rose after a mixed batch of economic news, but as oil prices stabilized at lower levels. Intel gained, while Wal-Mart stumbled.

  • Boeing, Protectionism and the Chicago Connection Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 9:33 AM ET
    Boeing Headquarters

    The decision by the Pentagon to hand a $30 billion contract to Boeing to supply refueling planes to the US Air Force has raised eyebrows across Europe and the defense industry as the tender had originally gone to a consortium led by Europe's EADS.

  • Futures Remain Higher After GDP Revision Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 9:10 AM ET

    U.S. stock index futures rose ahead of the open, although gains were pared somewhat after a lower-than-expected revision to the fourth-quarter Gross Domestic Product.

  • Has MERS Captured the Government? Thursday, 24 Feb 2011 | 1:48 PM ET

    A persistent theme of NetNet is that faith in regulations to improve the financial sector is misplaced. Regulations are typically written under the direction of the most powerful financial institutions, and regulators operate as if they were agents of the companies they are allegedly regulating.

  • Labor Unions Are 'Bankrupting States': Sen. Johnson Wednesday, 23 Feb 2011 | 12:43 PM ET

    The collective bargaining process with public sector unions needs to be restructured to keep labor unions from “bankrupting states,” Sen. Ron Johnson, (R-Wisc.), told CNBC Wednesday.

  • France, Germany Threaten Libya With EU Sanctions Wednesday, 23 Feb 2011 | 11:03 AM ET
    Protests in Libya
  • Protesters fill the courtyard and steps outside the State Capitol building on February 16, 2010 in Madison, Wisconsin. Protesters were demonstrating against Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to eliminate collective bargaining rights for many state workers.

    The high-stakes fight in Wisconsin over union rights could have far-reaching effects on electoral politics in other states by helping solidify Republican power for years.

  • Will the Euro Crisis Strike Back? Monday, 21 Feb 2011 | 8:07 AM ET

    If previous EU responses to the euro crisis are any guide, investors should not be expecting a highly-coordinated, shock-and-awe approach like those we have seen from the US authorities.

  • The uprisings in the Middle East have been in part blamed on soaring food prices but one market watcher told CNBC those states with huge oil wealth should be better able to keep their people appeased by subsidizing food prices and other incentives.

  • 11 Major International Political Scandals Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 1:54 PM ET
    On April 6, 2011, Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is scheduled to stand trial for charges stemming from his relationship with Karima el-Mahroug, a nightclub dancer who performs under the name Ruby Heart-Stealer. According to the charges, he paid el-Mahroug for sex while she was still underage, and when she was arrested for theft, he used his political muscle to have her released from police custody. Berlusconi has been in this type of trouble before, but it’s widely speculated that this

    Click to see international political scandals that raised eyebrows and kept the tabloids in wide circulation.

  • Wisconsin Protesters Buoyed by Anti-Union Bill Delay Friday, 18 Feb 2011 | 11:29 AM ET
    Protesters fill the courtyard and steps outside the State Capitol building on February 16, 2010 in Madison, Wisconsin. Protesters were demonstrating against Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to eliminate collective bargaining rights for many state workers.

    Protesters who have descended on Wisconsin's Capitol in hopes of halting a Republican effort to end a half-century of collective bargaining rights for public workers steeled themselves for a long fight, buoyed by Democrats' decision to flee to avoid the measure's near-certain passage.

  • BP Made Faustian Deal With the Kremlin: Critic Tuesday, 15 Feb 2011 | 6:02 AM ET

    The recent deal between BP and the Russian oil and gas giant Rosneft was a Faustian pact that was forced on the London-listed major by the Kremlin, William Browder, a well known Russia critic, told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Weber Says Hawkish Views Led to ECB Race Exit Monday, 14 Feb 2011 | 5:29 AM ET

    Bundesbank president Axel Weber said a lack of political acceptance in the eurozone for his hawkish monetary views had driven his abrupt decision not to run. The FT reports.