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  • US Inquiry Said to Focus on California Pension Fund Friday, 7 Jan 2011 | 7:40 AM ET

    Federal regulators are investigating whether California violated securities laws and failed to provide adequate disclosure about its giant public pension fund, according to a person with knowledge of the investigation. The New York Times reports.

  • Mark Madoff’s Name Became Too Big a Burden to Bear Friday, 17 Dec 2010 | 7:19 AM ET
    Financier Bernard Madoff (R) with his sons Mark Madoff (L) and Andrew Madoff (C) during July 2001 in Montauk, NY.

    Behind the screen, the burdens of life as Bernie Madoff’s son — the continuing suspicion from the public, the harsh accusations in numerous lawsuits, and his exile from the world of Wall Street — steadily became unsustainable.

  • Gift Cards With Bells and Whistles Saturday, 11 Dec 2010 | 1:10 PM ET

    Retailers are adding features like aromas, photos and recorded messages to make gift cards more attractive.

  • Managers Cut the Cash, Set Stage for Selloff Tuesday, 16 Nov 2010 | 2:19 PM ET

    Investor exuberance as evidenced in a recent survey of fund managers may have foretold the current market selloff.

  • Do We Have Income Inequality Backward? Monday, 8 Nov 2010 | 11:41 AM ET

    While the growth of income inequality in the United States is shocking and is surely transforming the economic and political landscape, that transformation may be very different from what many analysts expect.

  • Money Woes Can Be Early Clue to Alzheimer’s Sunday, 31 Oct 2010 | 9:02 AM ET

    New research shows that one of the first signs of impending dementia is an inability to understand money and credit, contracts and agreements., reports the New York Times.

  • Bank of America and GMAC are firing up their formidable foreclosure machines again, after a brief pause, but homeowners are asking why lenders often balk at short sales. The New York Times reports.

  • Income Inequality: Too Big to Ignore Sunday, 17 Oct 2010 | 6:12 PM ET
    broke

    Economics was founded by moral philosophers, and links between the two disciplines remain strong. So why won’t economists make judgments on the gap between rich and poor?

  • Scrutinizing the Elite, Whether They Like It or Not Sunday, 17 Oct 2010 | 9:20 AM ET

    The rich are sitting firmly in the public cross hairs, especially as the economy continues to stumble. Reports that Wall Street bonuses will again be high, and the debate in Congress over tax increases for the wealthy, just add to the outrage.

  • Warren Buffett keeps his #2 slot on the new Forbes 400 list of the Richest Americans, released tonight (Wednesday).  The magazine estimates Buffett's fortune at $45 billion.  That's $5 billion more than last year's $40 billion.

  • A growing number of people in their 50s and 60s who desperately want or need to work to pay for retirement are starting to worry that they may be discarded from the work force — forever.

  • How Much Will You Owe? Tax Plans Compared Saturday, 18 Sep 2010 | 1:57 PM ET

    In the debate over the effect of the expiring Bush tax cuts on small business, it’s already possible to do the math. And the Obama administration is pointing to the tax savings that all small-business owners would reap from its own plan to extend the cuts at all but the highest income levels — if, that is, the alternative is letting the cuts expire altogether.

  • Rethinking Investments After a Flight to Security Thursday, 16 Sep 2010 | 10:49 AM ET

    Shaken by what seemed to be an earthquake in the world’s financial markets two years ago, millions of retirees fled to safety, shifting their holdings into safer investments. What should they do now? The NYT reports.

  • Even if the Bush tax cuts for the wealthy—those making over $250,000 a year—are taken away, it doesn’t necessarily mean they’ll be paying more in taxes, according to one tax expert.

  • Purchase Power: Will It Make You Happy? Sunday, 8 Aug 2010 | 8:35 AM ET

    The practices that consumers have adopted in response to the economic crisis ultimately could...make them happier. New studies of consumption and happiness show, for instance, that people are happier when they spend money on experiences instead of material objects, when they relish what they plan to buy long before they buy it, and when they stop trying to outdo the Joneses.

  • 'Wealth Gap' Threatening African Americans: Exec Monday, 26 Jul 2010 | 2:28 PM ET

    There is a wealth-gap crisis in the United States that is threatening African-American families, Robert Johnson, chairman and founder of the RLJ Companies, told CNBC Monday.

  • 'Daddy, Are We Rich?' and Other Tough Questions Saturday, 10 Jul 2010 | 10:46 AM ET
    Money in Mattress

    There is nothing like an inquisitive child to make you realize just how complicated the topic of money is.

  • Credit Card Hackers Visit Hotels All Too Often Tuesday, 6 Jul 2010 | 11:50 AM ET
    Service bell at hotel reception

    Here's something that the struggling hotel sector prefers not to spotlight: it is a favorite target of hackers. The NYT reports.

  • From Card Fees to Mortgages, a New Day for Consumers Friday, 25 Jun 2010 | 1:29 PM ET
    Credit Cards

    After months of haggling, the terms of financial reform are set in Congress. The New York Times explains how this will impact your wallet.

  • Bad Fortune: Five Bizarre Billionaire Murders Wednesday, 23 Jun 2010 | 2:13 PM ET
    Mourners attend the funeral of Egyptian billionaire Ashraf Marwan in Cairo 01 July 2007. The controversial celebrity allegedly acted as a secret agent for the Israeli secret service during the 1973 Arab-Israeli war, reportedly with the code name 'Babel'. Ashraf Marwan was found dead in London on 27 June 2007 and was a son-in-law of former Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser.

    The world's wealthiest people can, and often do, surround themselves with bodyguards, travel in armored cars with bullet-proof glass and live within well-guarded fortresses. Still, no one is completely immune to murderous plots — not even billionaires.

 

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