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  • The Town Known as Terrorism Central Thursday, 12 May 2011 | 1:14 AM ET
    Osama bin Laden

    It will forever be known as the place where the United States finally caught up with Osama Bin Laden but the Pakistani garrison town of Abbottabad has been described as the country’s ‘Terrorism Central,’ according to the executive director of the Asia-Pacific Foundation.

  • The Most Expensive U.S. Military Vehicles Thursday, 5 May 2011 | 4:12 PM ET
    According to its manufacturer, Lockheed Martin, the F-22 Raptor is the best combat aircraft on earth. While this might seem tantamount to saying your son is brilliant, one look at the aircraft’s capabilities actually bears out the manufacturer’s statement. It can break the sound barrier, it can avoid detection by radar and it can shoot down cruise missiles. Unfortunately, an Air Force budget document estimated that one unit costs $150 million, with an overall program cost of $65 billion. The hig

    No other country on earth has a larger defense budget than the United States. What are the most expensive U.S. military vehicles? Find out.

  • New Yorkers React To Bin Ladens Death

    The  death of Osama Bin Laden has dealt a serious blow to Al Qaeda recruitment and has diminished the organization’s capability, Asa Hutchinson, former Under Secretary of Homeland Security told CNBC on Wednesday.

  • Enhanced Interrogations Led to Bin Laden Kill: Senator Tuesday, 3 May 2011 | 12:59 AM ET
    The hideout of Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin

    A member of the US Senate Intelligence Committee has told CNBC that the death of Osama Bin Laden was a direct result of enhanced interrogations.

  • Biggest Government Contractors Friday, 8 Apr 2011 | 1:12 PM ET
    Contracted in 2010: $35.9 billion* Total 2010 revenue: $45.8 billion Contracted in 2011, so far: $15.74 billion  Headquartered Lockheed’s dependence on contracts from the U.S. Government is no secret. The company researches, designs, develops and manufactures satellites, space vehicles, combat aircraft, missile defense systems, aeronautics and intelligence systems, which are essentially out of the scope of non-government consumers. Lockheed’s biggest contracts in 2010 included a $2.51 billion co

    As the U.S. moves closer to the so-called "Fiscal Cliff", big ticket government spending areas like defense programs are likely to be at the center of the debate.

  • EADS' Next Move     Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 9:53 AM ET

    An outlook on the aeronautic defense and space industry as companies watch events in Libya closely, with Sean O'Keefe, EADS North America CEO.

  • Divided Libya Looks 'Increasingly Likely' Tuesday, 22 Mar 2011 | 4:17 AM ET
    A Libyan jet bomber crashes after being shot down in Benghazi on March 19, 2011 as Libya's rebel stronghold came under attack, with at least two air strikes and sustained shelling of the city's south sending thick smoke into the sky.

    As anti-aircraft fire rang out across Tripoli for the third night in a row and US airstrikes yet to slow, one analyst told CNBC that there is a very real chance of Libya being divided between the Gaddafi-controlled West and rebel-controlled East.

  • BAE Braced for Tough US Curbs Monday, 7 Mar 2011 | 1:28 AM ET

    BAE Systems is braced for the imposition of strict curbs on its business by the U.S., as it moves closer to resolving a year-long review by the State Department of its guilty plea to a conspiracy charge last year, the Financial Times reported.

  • China Signals Dominance in Stealth Jet Test Flight Thursday, 3 Mar 2011 | 11:09 PM ET
    Flag of the People's Republic of China

    Washington Post columnist John Pomfret argues the recent test flight of the J-20 stealth fighter just hours before U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates met with Chinese President Hu Jintao was a blunt challenge by the military establishment to Hu's power.  Pomfret surmises there is chaos within China's political circles because it appeared to Gates that Hu did not know of the test. Pomfret's hypothesis would certainly be a scary if true.

  • A Government Shutdown Might Not Shut Down Government Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 11:36 AM ET

    Fewer than half of the 2.1 million federal workers subject to a shutdown would be forced off the job if the Obama administration followed the path taken by presidents Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton

  • Boeing, Protectionism and the Chicago Connection Friday, 25 Feb 2011 | 9:33 AM ET
    Boeing Headquarters

    The decision by the Pentagon to hand a $30 billion contract to Boeing to supply refueling planes to the US Air Force has raised eyebrows across Europe and the defense industry as the tender had originally gone to a consortium led by Europe's EADS.

  • How Much Did You Pay For The Super Bowl Flyover? Wednesday, 9 Feb 2011 | 4:10 PM ET
    Super Bowl XLV at Cowboys Stadium

    The U.S. Navy is hoping to put into context the cost and the purpose of the flyover of four F-18 fighter jets on Super Bowl Sunday.

  • Defense Tech CEO Paul Cofoni On Our Dangerous World Friday, 4 Feb 2011 | 1:01 PM ET

    With the nation's deficit continuing to balloon, the knife is out to slash budgets. One of the items on the chopping block is the defense budget.

  • Egyptian Stocks Face Another 10% Plunge Monday, 31 Jan 2011 | 8:44 AM ET

    The Egyptian stock market will likely tumble another 10 percent before investors put some cash in and try to stage a rally, after which the benchmark index could regain a third of its losses, according to historical trends, Robin Griffiths, technical strategist at Cazenove Capital, told CNBC Monday.

  • Investing in The Defense Sector of Tomorrow  Friday, 28 Jan 2011 | 10:51 AM ET

    Cut backs in defense spending have been hanging over the sector for about year and now. Wall Street waits to see when the axe will fall. But that doesn't mean that investors should be sitting on their laurels waiting for it to happen.

  • Suspicious Bank Letter Was Greeting Card: NYPD Wednesday, 19 Jan 2011 | 12:53 PM ET

    New York City police say a suspicious letter sent to a midtown Manhattan bank turned out to be a greeting card from a headhunting firm.

  • ITT Splitting Into Three Separate Companies Wednesday, 12 Jan 2011 | 8:14 AM ET

    Defense contractor ITT says it will split itself into three publicly traded companies, separating its defense and information business, its water technology unit and its industrial products business.

  • U.S. Sailor standing on deck of a ship

    Topping the list of budget cuts announced by Defense Secretary Robert Gates is a more than $10 billion Marine Corps amphibious project known as the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle, manufactured by General Dynamics.

  • Chemical Giant Ends Iran Deals After CNBC Report Tuesday, 14 Dec 2010 | 8:33 AM ET

    Chemical giant Transammonia is ending all ties with Iran following a CNBC investigation into its business dealings there.

  • More than 36 percent of the tuition payments made in the first year of the program—a total of $640 million in tuition and fees—went to for-profit colleges, like the University of Phoenix, according to data compiled by the Department of Veterans Affairs, even though these colleges serve only about 9 percent of the overall population at higher education institutions nationwide, the New York Times reports.

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