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  • Clinton Scores Big Win in New Hampshire Wednesday, 9 Jan 2008 | 7:27 AM ET
    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

    Democrat Hillary Clinton defied the polls and narrowly upset Barack Obama in New Hampshire on Tuesday, breathing new life into her U.S. presidential campaign after finishing third in Iowa.

  • Is Crying Good or Bad for Clinton's Chances? Tuesday, 8 Jan 2008 | 12:12 PM ET

    Voting in New Hampshire ends at 8 p.m. EST on Tuesday, with results expected to begin rolling in quickly.

  • Teary-Eyed Hillary Clinton Vows to Fight On Tuesday, 8 Jan 2008 | 10:24 AM ET
    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (AP Photo/The Meridian Star, Kyle Carter)

    A teary-eyed Hillary Clinton pushed for support on Monday as polls showed her poised for a huge New Hampshire loss to Democratic rival Barack Obama, but the former front-runner vowed to carry on with her presidential quest even if she loses.

  • Hillary's "New" Song And McCain's Retro Sound Tuesday, 8 Jan 2008 | 10:13 AM ET

    Hillary Clinton, fighting for a comeback showing in New Hampshire, has begun playing Bruce Springsteen's "The Rising," which also happens also to be the anthem of John Edwards' populist campaign.

  • Obama Jumps Into the Lead In New Hampshire Race Monday, 7 Jan 2008 | 5:37 PM ET
    Barack Obama

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton battled to keep crucial New Hampshire from swinging to rival Barack Obama, but new polls showed him jumping into the lead.

  • Goldman Sachs: The "Safe" Stocks For Primary Season Monday, 7 Jan 2008 | 4:20 PM ET

    Goldman Sachs analysts say stock investors should look to larger cap and defensive sectors as a way to play the uncertainty of presidential primary season. While they say the major party nominees should become clear by "Super Duper Tuesday," there is greater electoral and policy uncertainty in this Presidential race because there are no incumbents running.

  • This is the time of the presidential race when the convergence of politicians and press is nearly complete. The Radisson, in downtown Manchester, is the closest thing there is to ground zero of the New Hampshire campaign. All the networks of NBC are broadcasting from this spot and thus all the candidates are coming here.

  • This week, New Hampshire becomes the gateway to a new political world--engaging multiple constituencies, playing out over a vast terrain, shifting the psychology of competition. But as the 2008 campaign moves toward contests in Michigan, Nevada, South Carolina, Florida, then half the country on Feb. 5, the simplicity and careful planning of Iowa and New Hampshire phase give way to a complex, high-velocity game of survivor.

  • Obama, Huckabee Win First 2008 US Vote Friday, 4 Jan 2008 | 1:14 AM ET

    Barack Obama took a big step on Thursday toward becoming the first black U.S. president as his campaign for change caught fire in Iowa and swept him past Hillary Clinton in the opening Democratic nominating contest.

  • Iowa Votes: Three Key Points You Should Keep In Mind Thursday, 3 Jan 2008 | 1:55 PM ET
    Iowa map

    Here are three things to watch for when Iowans vote tonight: 1) Mobilization: if Democratic turnout is huge, that's a sign that Barack Obama has succeeded in pulling out enough independent voters to win. It would also show the energy and enthusiasm that Democrats hope will give them an edge in the general election.

  • CNBC Trillion Dollar Survey: It's Clinton vs. Romney Thursday, 3 Jan 2008 | 12:17 PM ET

    Regardless of what happens today in Iowa, the 2008 presidential contest will come down to Hillary Clinton and Mitt Romney, according to a CNBC Trillion Dollar Snap Survey of some of the nation's top money managers, investment strategists and professional economists.

  • Iowa Countdown: Songs, Jokes And The Redskins Wednesday, 2 Jan 2008 | 2:54 PM ET

    Snapshots from the closing hours of the Iowa caucus: Song choices: At John Edwards rallies, Bruce Springsteen's "The Rising." At Barack Obama's, Stevie Wonder's "Signed, Sealed and Delivered." At Hillary Clinton's, Dolly Parton's "9 to 5." At Mike Huckabee's rally in Des Moines last night, it was "Sweet Home Alabama" --except the candidate himself was on stage strumming guitar with a local band.

  • We have a new Wall Street Journal-NBC News poll that's shaking up the Republican presidential race, since Rudy Giuliani has lost his national lead. But it's also shaking up Ron Paul's legions of Internet supporters--because he fared so poorly at just 4 percent of the vote. Because his numbers were so low I didn't mention Paul in my Wall Street Journal story on the poll.

  • Congress Gives AMT Relief For 20 Million Taxpayers Thursday, 20 Dec 2007 | 9:13 AM ET

    Congress approved a one-year delay in imposing the alternative minimum tax on over 20 million additional taxpayers. President Bush will sign the measure.

  • Bush Still Wields Power (Veto) Against Democrats Friday, 14 Dec 2007 | 3:24 PM ET

    With an approval rating stuck in the 30s, President Bush no longer holds many political cards. But he still has one ace in the form of his veto pen. That's a substantial weapon--as President Bill Clinton showed against the Republican Congress in 1996 and Bush is showing against the Democratic Congress now.

  • GOP's Gap: Enthusiasm For Presidential Candidates Thursday, 13 Dec 2007 | 12:53 PM ET
    Iowa map

    Whatever happens in the Iowa caucuses, this year's contests have made plain that Republicans face a general election problem whoever the two parties' nominees are: an enthusiasm gap. Democratic campaigns expect that 125,000 or more Iowans will turn out for their caucuses on Jan 3. Republican campaign expect half that.

  • House Passes AMT Fix, Again Thursday, 13 Dec 2007 | 10:35 AM ET

    Confronting the Senate and White House, House Democrats for a second time passed tax relief for 21 million people, going after companies and hedge fund managers that shelter money offshore. The vote Wednesday was a near party-line 226-193.

  • Washington "Scuffles" Providing Political "Shuffles" Monday, 10 Dec 2007 | 12:14 PM ET

    I can't help noticing the dramatic difference between the political and government parts of my beat these days--complete gridlock in Washington and turbulent action on the 2008 campaign trail. In the capital, Democrats and Republicans are fighting over literally everything--the budget, energy legislation, a fix for the out of control Alternative Minimum Tax.

  • Treasury Sides with Senate in AMT Standoff Friday, 7 Dec 2007 | 2:39 PM ET

    The Treasury has weighed in on the side of the US Senate in a standoff with the House of Representatives over how to prevent the Alternative Minimum Tax from spreading to millions of new taxpayers this year.

  • What does gridlock in Washington mean, to business and to everyone else? It means avoiding the sacred cows of both parties even if that waters down whatever action government takes. It means least-common-denominator solutions--or half-solutions--to whatever problem is on the table at the time.