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Federal Budget (U.S.)

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  • House Passes Tax, Energy Bill Friday, 8 Dec 2006 | 4:50 PM ET

    The House of Representatives has approved legislation that extends popular tax breaks, opens the Gulf of Mexico to new oil and gas drilling and cancels a scheduled pay cut for doctors who treat the elderly under Medicare.

  • Market Wrap: Modest Gains On Mixed Data Friday, 8 Dec 2006 | 4:46 PM ET

    Here's our last look at the markets today--U.S. stocks rallied modestly after a better-than-expected U.S. jobs report sparked the first weekly gain in equities in the last month. Also--market moving comments heard on CNBC today from Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson sent the U.S. dollar higher. Mary Thompson has all the winners and loser - she's CNBC's "Eye On The Floor."

  • Today on cnbc.com Friday, 8 Dec 2006 | 7:56 AM ET

    Good morning. We'll start with our quote of the day from journalist Barry C. Forbes: "Don't forget until too late that the business of life is not business but living." Something to remember for those working 10 hour days. Now--here's what's ahead for the day on cnbc.com and CNBC-TV.

  • CNBC's Liesman: U.S. Jobs Report Preview Thursday, 7 Dec 2006 | 1:51 PM ET
    Steve Liesman photo

    The markets are more than likely gearing up for the most anticipated piece of economic data this week--that's the U.S. jobs report for November. It comes out Friday. CNBC's Steve Liesman gave a preview on "Power Lunch." Steve said the Dow Jones Survey of Economists sees job growth of 110,000 for November.

  • Iraq Study Group: Impact On U.S. Economy Wednesday, 6 Dec 2006 | 12:56 PM ET

    The Iraq Study Group is out with its findings. The questions remain: Will President Bush listen and what impact will this have on the U.S. economy. CNBC's John Harwood appeared on "Morning Call." Harwood said the report basically came down to a couple of major conclusions: more diplomacy is needed and a reduced role for U.S. troops by 2008.

  • CNBC's Santelli And Analyst: Yield Curve Debate Monday, 4 Dec 2006 | 8:14 AM ET

    The yield curve has not been this inverted (where short term interest rates are higher than long term) since December of 2000--and the last time around--that level of inversion foreshadowed a steep decline in the equity market.