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Federal Budget (U.S.)

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  • Spending the Stimulus: TVs, Tuition -- and Bills Friday, 30 May 2008 | 11:09 AM ET
    Tax Refund Check

    Many Americans allowed themselves to fantasize about large-screen TVs, European vacations and other luxuries when they learned of the federal rebates they'd be getting this spring and early summer.

  • Inflation-Wary Fed Looks Ahead to Rate Hikes Wednesday, 28 May 2008 | 9:33 PM ET
    Federal Reserve

    Two Federal Reserve policy-makers warned on Wednesday that interest rate increases might be needed before too long to curb inflation, even as the United States struggles with a weak economy.

  • Banks Alienate Customers By Raising Fees: Study Wednesday, 28 May 2008 | 12:25 PM ET
    ATM

    A rise in fees has led to growing dissatisfaction with retail banks, which may be sacrificing long term growth in favor of short-term gains, J.D. Power and Associates said in a study.

  • Analyst: Financial Crisis Winding Down Tuesday, 27 May 2008 | 8:44 AM ET

    There are several signs that the financial crisis that has long plagued the market is winding down, according to one expert.

  • Greenspan Says Recession Still Likely in US: FT Monday, 26 May 2008 | 8:47 PM ET
    On his last day as chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Alan Greenspan smiles as he presides over his final Federal Open Market Committee meeting at the the Fed's headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006. He is speaking to Deborah J. Danker, at left, special assistant to the board, with Vice Chairman Roger W. Ferguson Jr., at right. Greenspan has held the post for more than 18 years and is widely viewed as the most successful chairman in the Fed's 92-year h

    Former Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan was quoted on Tuesday as saying the United States was still more likely than not to have a recession despite relative stabilization in the economy in recent weeks.

  • Buffett: Banks Are to Blame For Subprime Debt Crisis Sunday, 25 May 2008 | 10:20 AM ET
    Warren Buffett

    Blame for the sub-prime crisis lies at the feet of banks who took too many risks in mortgage lending, Warren Buffett told a Madrid newspaper. Earlier, the billionaire investor said he expected a "long, deep" recession. 

  • Paulson on Oil: Don't Blame Speculators Thursday, 22 May 2008 | 5:55 PM ET

    U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson told CNBC Thursday that rising oil prices are not driven by market speculation but instead reflect tight supplies and growing global demand.

  • Wall Street appears resigned to the idea that the Federal Reserve is done cutting interest rates, but a patchy economy could force policy-makers to keep their scissors handy.

  • High Food Prices Likely to Continue For a Decade Thursday, 22 May 2008 | 11:56 AM ET
    Vegetables

    High food prices will continue for at least a decade even if they drop from the levels that sparked street protests or riots in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean in recent months, government-backed international agencies say.

  • Fed's Kroszner: Mortgage Market to Recover Slowly Thursday, 22 May 2008 | 10:03 AM ET
    Randall S. Kroszner

    The US mortgage market will recover slowly from a wave of bad loans that threw financial markets into crisis and the lending system will need repairs, Federal Reserve Governor Randall Kroszner said Thursday.

  • Jobless Claims Fall, But Employment Outlook Still Dim Thursday, 22 May 2008 | 8:37 AM ET

    The number of U.S. workers filing initial claims for jobless benefits unexpectedly fell by 9,000 last week to its lowest level in a month, the government said Thursday, but remained at elevated levels to underscore a sluggish jobs market.

  • Abby Joseph Cohen Sees Interest Rates Rising Wednesday, 21 May 2008 | 5:13 PM ET

    Goldman Sachs Senior Investment Strategist Abby Joseph Cohen told CNBC Wednesday that she sees U.S. interest rates climbing, though not necessarily in the short term.

  • FOMC Minutes from Meeting of April 29-30 Wednesday, 21 May 2008 | 2:20 PM ET

    The following is the text of the minutes from the Federal Open Market Committee's meeting of April 29 to 30, issued on Wednesday.

  • Fed Sees Slower Growth But Signals Rate Pause Wednesday, 21 May 2008 | 2:04 PM ET

    The Fed cut its economic growth forecast and warned of higher inflation and unemployment but signaled more rate cuts are unlikely.  "If you had any doubt that the Fed is signaling a pause, that doubt is gone," said one economist.

  • Fed's Kohn: More Trouble From Housing, Inflation Tuesday, 20 May 2008 | 11:42 AM ET
    Donald L. Kohn

    US interest rates seem to be at the right level to help the sputtering economy without sparking inflation, but policy-makers need to be ready to adjust quickly in the face of a highly uncertain outlook, Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Donald Kohn said Tuesday.

  • Inflation Pressures Growing At the Wholesale Level Tuesday, 20 May 2008 | 9:04 AM ET

    US inflation at the wholesale level rose slower than expected in April, but core inflation, which strips out volatile food and energy prices, rose twice as fast as expected.

  • What is Buffett Looking for in Europe? Tuesday, 20 May 2008 | 8:15 AM ET
    Warren Buffett

    The Oracle of Omaha is looking for European businesses with pre-tax profits of at least $75 million, but he says the bigger the better. The tour began in Frankfurt, continues in Lausanne, Switzerland Tuesday and rolls on to Madrid and Milan later in the week.

  • Economy Is Weak, But No Recession, Indicators Show Monday, 19 May 2008 | 10:06 AM ET

    The U.S. economy is weak but does not appear to be in a recession, according to a key forecasting gauge, the Conference Board reported.

  • Buffett: Fallout From Credit Crisis Not Over Yet Monday, 19 May 2008 | 9:30 AM ET
    Warren Buffett

    The fallout from the global credit crisis is not over yet, billionaire investor Warren Buffett said Monday.

  • Paulson: Economy Is Better But Housing Still a Threat Friday, 16 May 2008 | 12:11 PM ET
    Henry Paulson

    The US economy and financial markets will improve by year-end but housing still poses the biggest threat to the economy, Treasury Secretary Paulson predicted.