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  • President Barack Obama on Monday signed into law legislation that gives him "fast-track" power to push ahead on a Pacific Rim trade deal that has been the subject of intense debate in Congress and across the nation. Flanked by some of the lawmakers who supported the bill through a six-week congressional battle, Obama acknowledged that his fight to secure the 12-...

  • SALT LAKE CITY— Contact-lens manufacturers say a hotly contested Utah law banning minimum prices for their product takes direct aim at their business model, and they will lose money if it stays on the books. Alcon Laboratories, Johnson& Johnson and Bausch& Lomb say in new court documents that the law violates interstate commerce rules because it allows discount...

  • NEW YORK— Police Commissioner William Bratton renewed his opposition on Monday to a set of proposed regulations on use of force and other policing issues, telling City Council members that the New York Police Department can reform itself. New policies "are better achieved through collaboration and dialogue between the council and the department, and among...

  • WASHINGTON, June 29- President Barack Obama signed into law on Monday legislation that gives him "fast-track" power to negotiate trade deals and speed them through Congress, but he said he still has a battle ahead to finalize the 12- nation Trans-Pacific Partnership deal.

  • Five Democratic and two Republican members of Congress watched as Obama affixed his name to the two bills. The trade bill gives Congress the right to approve or reject trade agreements, but not change or delay them. "I think it's fair to say that getting these bills through Congress has not been easy," Obama said.

  • The Louisville Metro Council's decision to raise the minimum wage does not conflict with state law, Jefferson County Circuit Court Judge Judith McDonald-Burkman ruled. "The Metro Council and I took this step year to provide working families a higher minimum wage because we know that many struggle to pay for housing, food, clothing and medical care," Louisville...

  • Shares of Consol Energy Inc. rose 2 percent to $22.83; Alpha Natural Resources Inc. rose 4 percent to 34 cents; Peabody Energy Corp. and Arch Coal Inc. jumped 9 percent. Walter Energy Inc. spiked 23 percent to 24 cents. Utilities also picked up steam, with Southern Co. gaining 48 cents to $42.38, Duke Energy Corp. up 56 cents to $71.56 and NextEra Energy Inc. up 62...

  • Paul LePage vetoed the $6.7 billion state budget on Monday, scolding lawmakers for rejecting his efforts to overhaul the state's tax code and welfare programs and accusing them of passing a status-quo spending plan just so they can return home for the summer. The Legislature will return Tuesday to try to overturn LePage's budget veto, along with dozens of...

  • NEW YORK, June 29- A U.S. appeals court said banks that enter repurchase agreements with brokerages do not qualify as "customers" entitled to special legal protections when those brokerages fail, in a case arising from Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc's 2008 bankruptcy. Monday's decision by the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals may free James Giddens, the trustee...

  • WASHINGTON/ SAN FRANCISCO, June 29- Oracle Corp won a major legal victory on Monday in a closely watched copyright case involving the company's Java programming language as the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear Google Inc's appeal. The decision upholds a ruling that allows Oracle to seek licensing fees for the use of some of the Java language.

  • WASHINGTON, June 29- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled that the Obama administration should have considered costs when it issued a key environmental regulation to limit emissions of mercury and other hazardous pollutants mainly from coal-fired power plants.

  • SUPREME COURT RULES THAT OBAMA ADMINISTRATION UNLAWFULLY FAILED TO CONSIDER COSTS WHEN DECIDING TO REGULATE MERCURY POLLUTION FROM POWER PLANTS.

  • TRENTON, N.J.— New Jersey residents with low incomes could see higher tax rebates under a proposal from Gov. Chris Christie being considered by the Legislature. The Legislature approved the measure Monday, one day before Christie is to announce his presidential campaign in northern New Jersey.

  • WASHINGTON— Trading sharp words, a deeply divided Supreme Court upheld the use of a controversial drug in lethal-injection executions Monday, even as two dissenting justices said for the first time they think it's "highly likely" the death penalty itself is unconstitutional. In the dispute over the lethal-injection drug, midazolam was used in Arizona, Ohio and...

  • WASHINGTON, June 29- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected bids by BP Plc and Anadarko Petroleum Corp to avoid penalties under federal pollution law in connection with the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The high court left in place a June 2014 ruling by the New Orleans- based 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which said the companies were liable for civil...

  • WASHINGTON— The Supreme Court is staying out of a long-running legal battle between technology giants Oracle and Google over copyright protection for a computer program that powers most of the world's smartphones and computer tablets. The justices said Monday they won't review an appeals court ruling that said software maker Oracle Corp. could copyright...

  • WASHINGTON, June 29- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear Google Inc's appeal in a major software copyright case, leaving intact a ruling that would allow Oracle Corp to charge licensing fees for the use of some of its Java programming language. The high court left in place a May 2014 ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in favor of...

  • WASHINGTON, June 29- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected bids by BP Plc and Anadarko Petroleum Corp to avoid penalties under federal pollution law in connection with the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

  • NEW ORLEANS— The Supreme Court won't hear appeals from BP and Anadarko Petroleum Corp. over Clean Water Act fines for the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The justices on Monday let stand a lower court ruling that said the owners of the blown-out Macondo well could not avoid federal fines for the spill by blaming another company's failed equipment.

  • WASHINGTON— The Supreme Court said Monday it will dive back into the fight over the use of race in admissions at the University of Texas, a decision that presages tighter limits on affirmative action in higher education. The case began in 2008 when Abigail Fisher, who is white, was denied admission to the University of Texas's flagship Austin campus because she...