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Supreme Court (U.S.)

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  • Man with wings

    In the coming decade, Linux and other open source implementations will continue their migration from back office transaction processing and mission critical applications to the mobile and desktop computing spaces. This will transform the nature of communications and computing devices from static and utilitarian to dynamic and intelligent, writes Keith Bergelt, CEO of Open Invention Network.

  • High Court Question: Is Workplace Texting Private? Monday, 14 Dec 2009 | 10:33 AM ET

    The Supreme Court says it will decide how much privacy workers have when they send text messages from company accounts.

  • Enron's Jeffrey Skilling Seeks New Trial Friday, 11 Dec 2009 | 4:01 PM ET
    Jeffrey Skilling

    Attorneys for former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling say the law under which he was convicted in 2006 is "unconstitutionally vague," and that he government has repeatedly misused the law to suit "whatever meaning is necessary to prosecute whatever defendant happens to be in the government's sights."

  • Supreme Court Weighs Validity of Anti-Fraud Law Monday, 7 Dec 2009 | 12:07 PM ET

    The Supreme Court has raised doubts about the validity of part of the anti-fraud law enacted in response to Enron and other corporate scandals early this decade.

  • Pfizer to Leave City That Won Major Land-Use Case Friday, 13 Nov 2009 | 12:11 PM ET
    A man walks past a sign for a Pfizer facility in the Fort Trumbull area of New London, Connecticut.

    Pfizer said it would pull 1,400 jobs out of New London within two years and move most of them a few miles away to a campus it owns in Groton, Conn., as a cost-cutting measure. It would leave behind the city’s biggest office complex and an adjacent swath of barren land that was cleared of dozens of homes to make room for a hotel, stores and condominiums that were never built.

  • Justices Poke Fun at Patents for the Abstract Tuesday, 10 Nov 2009 | 8:11 AM ET

    Supreme Court justices took up a case on Monday that could reshape the realm of what can be patented, and expressed skepticism about giving protection to abstract business innovations.

  • In the wake of the financial crisis and its attendant repercussions across the global economy, the U.S. Congress stands poised to address the issue of patent reform, writes Keith Bergelt, CEO of Open Invention Network.

  • When former Enron CEO Jeff Skilling appeals to the Supreme Court the 2006 conviction that sent him to prison for a 24-year sentence, his defense will argue that the "honest services" statute under which he was convicted lacks clarity, Skilling's attorney Daniel Petrocelli told CNBC Monday.

  • Supreme Court Will Hear Appeal of Enron's Skilling Tuesday, 13 Oct 2009 | 11:32 AM ET
    Jeffrey Skilling

    The Supreme Court will consider throwing out the convictions of former Enron Chief Executive Officer Jeff Skilling for his role in the collapse of the onetime energy giant.

  • The Supreme Court has refused to hear former Qwest CEO Joseph Nacchio's appeal of his insider trading conviction.

  • US Supreme Court

    The new Supreme Court term that begins Monday will be dominated by cases concerning corporations, compensation and the financial markets that could signal the justices’ attitude toward regulatory constraints at a time of extraordinary government intervention in the economy.

  • Sonia Sotomayor, as nominee for US Supreme Court Justice.

    Hispanic America is celebrating Saturday’s swearing-in of Sonia Sotomayor as a Supreme Court Justice. African-Americans are happy that both the Attorney General of the United States and the man in the Oval Office are black like them. And much of Caucasian Nation is breathing a self-satisfied sigh of relief because diversity has flowered and our country’s long-standing, race problems are behind us.

  • Sotomayor Gets Senate Judiciary Committee Approval Tuesday, 28 Jul 2009 | 12:33 PM ET
    Sonia Sotomayor, as nominee for US Supreme Court Justice.

    The Senate Judiciary Committee has voted to approve Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor to be the first Hispanic justice.

  • Sotomayor On the High Court: What Business Can Expect Wednesday, 15 Jul 2009 | 12:16 PM ET
    Sonia Sotomayor, as nominee for US Supreme Court Justice.

    Though Sonia Sotomayor is widely expected to win confirmation to the US Supreme Court, the business community is still wondering just what kind of justice she'll be

  • Sotomayor Defends 'Wise Latina' Remark Tuesday, 14 Jul 2009 | 12:17 PM ET
    Sonia Sotomayor, as nominee for US Supreme Court Justice.

    Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor defended herself Tuesday against charges that her speeches and rulings show racial bias, telling a Senate panel vetting her nomination that critics had misunderstood her record.

  • Automakers’ Swift Cases in Bankruptcy Shock Experts Tuesday, 7 Jul 2009 | 11:09 AM ET
    GM and Chrysler bankruptcy

    In fewer than 45 days each, General Motors and Chrysler swept through government-sponsored sales in bankruptcy court — quick tours that most people in the legal community thought impossible not long ago.

  • Court Ruling Could Mean Trouble for TiVo Thursday, 2 Jul 2009 | 12:56 PM ET
    Tivo

    It's been a tumultuous summer for DVR service TiVo, with a handful of court rulings that have sent the stock bouncing all over the place. The latest news is sending the stock down.

  • President Barack Obama

    President Obama's approval rating eased by five points this spring as Americans worried  about unemployment and the federal budget deficit, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.

  • Exxon Ordered to Pay Interest on Alaska Spill Award Tuesday, 16 Jun 2009 | 1:25 PM ET
    Exxon Mobile

    Exxon Mobil was ordered Monday to pay about $500 million in interest on punitive damages for the Exxon Valdez oil spill off Alaska, nearly doubling the payout to Alaska Natives, fishermen, business owners and others harmed by the 1989 disaster.

  • Historic Anti-Smoking Bill Gives FDA New Powers Friday, 12 Jun 2009 | 6:24 PM ET
    Tobacco

    Historic anti-smoking legislation sped to final congressional passage on Friday— after a bitter fight lasting nearly a half-century— and lawmakers and the White House quickly declared it would save the lives of thousands of smokers of all ages.