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  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    On Friday, the market rollercoaster continues — and seems to end up nearly where it began. Panic in funds parallels equities. FDIC's Bair warns of more bank failures. But the SEC's short-selling ban gives financials a big boost.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    The Treasury plans to re-create the Resolution Trust Corporation. Calpers says it will no longer loan out shares of  Goldman Sachs  and Morgan Stanley to short sellers. Central banks worldwide announce plans to support money markets.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    AIG makes a deal with the Fed for loans up to $85 billion in exchange for a 79.9 percent stake in the insurer.  Barclays buys several Lehman businesses for $1.75 billion. WaMu is for sale. And the SEC announces rules against naked short selling.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    On Tuesday, even "good" financials start out looking pretty bad: Goldman Sachs' earnings plunge and AIG scares investors again. But volatility makes the market hard to predict.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    On Monday, the weekend's turmoil starts taking its toll. Stocks fall sharply Monday on a triptych of Wall Street woe: Lehman Brothers' bankruptcy filing; Merrill Lynch's acquisition by Bank of America; and AIG's unprecedented request for short-term financing from the Federal Reserve.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    Hurricane Ike takes a backseat to the the banking storm: BofA pulls out of Lehman to focus on Merrill Lynch. By late Saturday night, a deal has been drafted to acquire Lehman's bad assets and pave the way for an eventual sale of the firm.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    Lehman Brothers, Washington Mutual and AIG all  race against time leading to a weekend of work and worry.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    Uncertainty over guidance from Lehman Brothers casts a pall over the entire banking sector, including Merrill Lynch, Goldman Sachs — and Lehman itself.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    On Sunday, no rest for Wall Street. And the dominos fall. Lehman Brothers files for chapter 11 protection, Merrill Lynch sells itself to Bank of America and AIG prepares for a dramatic decision.

  • The Financial Crisis: This Day—One Year Ago, Sept. 10 Thursday, 10 Sep 2009 | 3:49 AM ET
    This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    Lehman Brothers moves closer to taking center stage in the crisis, but storm clouds also build over AIG and Washington Mutual.

  • On Tuesday, Lehman Brothers starts playing defense. Reports say Lehman management is considering moving up the release of its third-quarter earnings, which had been scheduled for next Thursday. Opinion is split on fannie and Freddie — with on builder calling a bottom.

  • Monday sees a dawn for markets...a false dawn. Investors rejoiced that the U.S. Treasury will take over Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, seeing a sign that housing troubles are over. Stock markets all over the world rocket upward. But not everyone shares the . Lehman Brothers  ends the day down 13 percent. Why?

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    The U.S. markets may be closed Sunday, but that doesn't stop rumblings and news on the financial front. Lehman Brothers officials are hoping to finalize plans to raise capital and sell off bad debts sometime this coming week. And U.S. Treasury officials expect to buy $5 billion of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac securities within the next month, as part of the takeover of the mortgage finance giants.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    For the troubled financial sector, Saturday brings no rest. The U.S. plans to bring mortgage finance firms Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac under Federal control, according to reports. The move could constitute the biggest financial bailout in American history. And shareholders are facing the prospect of a wipeout.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    It's a pretty black Friday. Another bleak unemployment report shows the August joblessness rate shot up to its highest level since summer of 2003. And the glum news seems to rattle every spoke on the financial hub.

  • White knights are hard to nail down as the savvy start hedging their bets and bear season arrives on Wall Street. The Lehman Brothers rumor mill heats up and investors turn a cold shoulder on stocks, as the indices enter bear-market territory.

  • The Financial Crisis: This Day—One Year Ago, Sept. 3 Thursday, 3 Sep 2009 | 7:00 AM ET
    This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    False optimism wars with bad omens. Lehman Brothers gained 5 percent following news that Ospraie Fund, a commodities fund in which Lehman had a 20 percent stake, was closing and would return money to investors after incurring big losses in 2008. The dollar hit an 11-month high against the euro, as belief spread that the credit crunch tsunami would turn on Europe—and that the U.S. had already weathered the worst.

  • Berkshire Hathaway 2009 Shareholder Meeting

    Warren Buffett says there are no plans for a buyback of Berkshire Hathaway stock right now, although he did not rule out the possibility in the future.

  • Pros Say: Economy To Go Positive Between Q3 — Q4 Wednesday, 1 Apr 2009 | 12:01 PM ET

    Wednesday: Pending sales of existing U.S. homes inched upward but home values keep slipping. Job losses in the U.S. private sector accelerated more than expected in March but planned layoffs are down. Pres. Obama urged unified action at the G20 meeting. Four regional banks were the first to pay back TARP funds. CNBC heard from experts who said the market will make a major move around Easter — and went overweight in stock portfolio allocation.

  • Pros Say: Inflation Danger = 'Kryptonite for Superman' Tuesday, 31 Mar 2009 | 12:15 PM ET

    Tuesday: Consumer confidence squeaked above its record low. Ford announced an incentive program -- covering payments if a buyer is laid off -- similar to Hyundai's. GM's new CEO Fritz henderson said bankruptcy is possible within 60 days. J.P. Morgan said global banks will write down $17 billion more. CNBC heard from experts who said retail looks less scary, housing is finally coming back — but warned that inflation could be "kryptonite" for bonds.