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Catastrophe

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  • Geopolitical tensions boil over     Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 8:11 AM ET

    Robert Hormats, Kissinger Associates, and Neal Wolin, former deputy Treasury secretary, share their thoughts on the ongoing turmoil in the Middle East and Russia's role in the crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17.

  • Who shot this plane down?     Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 8:05 AM ET
    Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 taking off from Schiphol Airport in Schiphol, the Netherlands, on July 17, 2014.

    The NTSB has not decided whether to go to Ukraine to investigate the crash of Malaysian Airlines flight MH 17 due to safety concerns, reports NBC's Tom Costello.

  • No black boxes found yet: Source     Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 8:02 AM ET

    CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera reports the latest details on the crash of Malaysian flight MH17.

  • Threat to global crude markets     Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 7:39 AM ET

    Carl Larry, Oil Outlooks & Opinions president, provides perspective on how geopolitical unrest is impacting oil prices.

  • Markets had Russia wrong: Expert     Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 7:09 AM ET

    Paul Christopher, Wells Fargo Advisers, and David Gordon, Eurasia Group chairman, provide perspective on the impact of additional sanctions against Russia on the markets.

  • Political reaction to global risks     Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 7:07 AM ET

    Former Deputy Treasury Secretary Neal Wolin provides political perspective on the handling of a missile attack on a Malaysian jet, and Israeli's invasion of Gaza,

  • Officials say Malaysian jet shot down     Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 7:00 AM ET

    The crash investigation of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 now focuses around pro-Russian separatist and the Russian military, reports CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, with the latest details. Also an update on Israel's ground offensive into Gaza.

  • We not seeing a mass risk-aversion flow to the U.S. dollar, says Boris Schlossberg, BK Asset Management, discussing how geopolitical unrest is impacting currencies.

  • Ukraine-Russia blame game     Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 6:09 AM ET

    Retired U.S. Army Col. Jack Jacobs, and Matthew Rojansky, The Wilson Center Russia program, share insight on the events surrounding the crash of Malaysia Flight MH17.

  • Raising the stakes on Russia     Friday, 18 Jul 2014 | 6:04 AM ET

    CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, and Jack Farchy, Financial Times, discuss the implications of rising geopolitical tensions between Russia and the West.

  • Former U.S. Ambassador to Russia, Michael McFaul, shares his thoughts on the political fallout from the Malaysian plane crash.

  • Investing in geopolitical hot spots     Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 | 12:47 PM ET

    CNBC contributor Tim Seymour shares his thoughts on the pitfalls of investing in areas of political unrest.

  • US has the right to investigate crash: Expert     Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 | 12:38 PM ET

    It will probably be some time before we know what exactly happened, says Bob Francis, former NTSB vice chairman.

  • According to a report, Russian President Putin told President Obama about the crash of the Malaysian jet in a pre-planned phone call, reports CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera.

  • Boeing focuses on last point of contact     Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 | 12:27 PM ET

    CNBC's Phil LeBeau reports there is no indication right now what might have happened to cause the crash of Malaysia Airline MH17.

  • Malaysia Airline confirms lost contact of MH17     Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 | 12:27 PM ET

    CNBC's Michelle Caruso-Cabrera reports there is official confirmation from Malaysia Airlines.

  • Last known MH17 contact was 33,000 feet     Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 | 12:14 PM ET

    At that altitude the airlines clearly thought they were free of danger, reports CNBC's Phil LeBeau.

  • Pres. Obama told of Malaysian crash     Thursday, 17 Jul 2014 | 12:04 PM ET

    The president is aware of news that a Malaysian jet has crashed in Eastern Ukraine, reports CNBC's Eamon Javers.

  • TOKYO, July 16- A nuclear plant in southern Japan cleared an initial safety hurdle on Wednesday which could make it the first nuclear facility to restart under tough new safety regulations after the industry was idled by the 2011 Fukushima disaster.

  • Japanese nuclear plant deemed safe, nears restart Wednesday, 16 Jul 2014 | 1:16 AM ET

    TOKYO— A Japanese nuclear plant won preliminary approval for meeting stringent post-Fukushima safety regulations Wednesday, an important step toward restarting the country's first reactors under the tighter rules applied after the 2011 disaster.