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  • Noda Gets My Vote for PM: Japan Economist     Friday, 26 Aug 2011 | 4:40 AM ET

    "My favourite candidate [to replace Naoto Kan as Prime Minister] is Yoshiko Noda, the finance minister, but as to who is most likely, that is still very hard to tell," Takuji Okubo, chief Japan economist at Societe Generale, told CNBC.

  • Investors pass by an electric board showing the figure of Nikkei stock average in Tokyo, Japan.

    The post-tsunami recovery of the Japanese economy is being hampered by the strong yen and the country needs a more concerted effort to get nuclear power stations up and running again, analysts told CNBC Monday.

  • Japan Politics an Obstacle for Tsunami Survivors     Wednesday, 10 Aug 2011 | 7:35 PM ET

    Rikuzen Takata, a seaside town in Japan's northeastern prefecture of Iwate, was one of the hardest hit communities after the March 11 tragedy. Survivors say the political gridlock in Tokyo is starving them of money they need to rebuild. CNBC's Kaori Enjoji reports.

  • Core Concerns: Fears After Fukushima     Tuesday, 26 Jul 2011 | 6:37 AM ET

    The nuclear industry has learned from the Japan crisis, says Marvin Fertel, Nuclear Energy Institute president/CEO, who says companies are taking steps to make nuclear energy production more safe.

  • Japan Determined to Beat Tsunami Crisis: Analyst Monday, 25 Jul 2011 | 7:56 AM ET

    The Japanese people are fighting hard to get the economy out of the slump that has followed the devastating earthquake and tsunami that blasted parts of the island nation in March, a Nomura analyst told CNBC Monday.

  • Bank of Japan Holds Fire, Unfazed by Recession Tuesday, 14 Jun 2011 | 3:55 AM ET

    The Bank of Japan kept monetary policy steady on Friday in a sign that a first-quarter economic slump did not change the central bank's view that growth will pick up late this year when the wounds from the devastating earthquake begin to heal.

  • Tokyo Grows Green Curtains to Save Power Monday, 13 Jun 2011 | 2:51 AM ET
    People march on the street during an anti nuclear demonstration in Tokyo on June 11, 2011.

    The odd looking goya has long been a popular ingredient in Japanese cuisine, but a Tokyo restaurant chain is now growing the courgette-shaped bitter melon to create “green curtains” outside the windows of several hundred of its eateries. The FT reports.

  • Colleges Now Offering Education in Disaster Friday, 10 Jun 2011 | 11:06 AM ET

    Carlene Pinto watched from her middle-school classroom in Brooklyn as the plane pierced the second tower; then she trudged the three miles home as paperwork and dust rained from the sky. Rebecca Rodriguez felt helpless as a teenager watching Hurricane Katrina unfold on television. And Lindsay Yates still shudders at the recollection of Hurricane Fran, which killed two dozen people in her native North Carolina when she was a second grader, the New York Times reports.

  • Economy Sends Japanese to Fukushima for Jobs Wednesday, 8 Jun 2011 | 9:49 PM ET
    Fukushima nuclear power plant shown on March 15, 2011 following earthquake and tsunami, Japan, Tokyo Electric Power Co.

    Despite the dangers at Fukushima, laborers from across Japan are traveling to the plant in search of work during the country’s harsh economic downturn.  The NYT reports.

  • Gas the Winner as Europe Rejects Nuclear: Analyst Wednesday, 8 Jun 2011 | 7:34 AM ET
    Exhaust plumes from cooling towers are seen at the Jaenschwalde lignite coal-fired power station in Janschwalde, Germany.

    European gas suppliers could see a boost from Germany's decision to phase out nuclear energy, with other countries set to follow Berlin's lead, Per Lekander, head of utilities research at UBS, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Employees of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant walk outside of the destroyed 4th block of the plant on February 24, 2011 ahead of the 25th anniversary of the meltdown of reactor number four due to be marked on April 26, 2011. Ukraine said early this year it will lift restrictions on tourism around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, formally opening the scene of the world's worst nuclear accident to visitors. Chernobyl's number-four reactor, in what was then the Soviet Union and now Ukraine, expl

    Nuclear safety watchdogs and G20 energy ministers gathering in Paris on Tuesday and Wednesday to work on reinforcing nuclear safety around the globe in the wake of the Japanese nuclear disaster at Fukushima last March were keen to stress nuclear energy is still a viable source of alternative energy.

  • China’s Nuclear Freeze to Last Until 2012 Tuesday, 7 Jun 2011 | 9:23 AM ET
    Nuclear Power Plant

    China’s freeze on new nuclear projects could last until the beginning of 2012, according to a senior industry official, underlining the gravity of China’s nuclear safety review. The FT reports.

  • Five Things to Watch: Auto Sales and More Tuesday, 31 May 2011 | 10:58 PM ET
    Steering wheel

    Raised debt ceiling rejected, May auto sales slumped and the LinkedInIPO emulated. Here's what we're watching...

  • 14 spectacularly wrong predictions Thursday, 19 May 2011 | 1:09 PM ET
    Titanic

    Even the most intellectually gifted prognosticators did not foresee key forces that would cause paradigm shifts in society.

  • In Japan Reactor Failings, Danger Signs for the US Wednesday, 18 May 2011 | 2:15 AM ET
    Picture shows the fuel assembly storage basin inside the reactor building at a Nuclear Power Plant near Landshut, Germany.

    Vents that American officials said would prevent devastating explosions at nuclear plants in the United States were put to the test in Japan and failed, the NYT reports.

  • Groups Wait for Earthquake Effect to Strike Home Monday, 16 May 2011 | 3:34 AM ET
    A man and his sister stand before their broken house, destroyed by the tsunami at Rikuzentakata in Iwate prefecture on March 17, 2011.

    The global surge in energy and commodity prices had a bigger financial impact on developing Asia’s big companies in the first quarter than Japan’s devastating earthquake and tsunami, results and trading updates suggest. The Financial Times reports.

  • Japan Ponders Its New Normal Thursday, 12 May 2011 | 2:22 AM ET
    Soldiers pull a boat across floodwater as they help to evacuate residents of Tagajo city, Miyagi

    Across Japan, there is a shared realization that the natural and nuclear disasters unleashed on March 11 have exposed the fragility of its postwar economic order — and that a recovery will not be a return to the status quo, the NYT reports.

  • Going Nuclear     Wednesday, 11 May 2011 | 9:46 AM ET

    CNBC's Jane Wells takes a look at the concerns over nuclear power after the earth shook in Japan.

  • Disaster Preparation: There’s An App For That Monday, 9 May 2011 | 2:03 PM ET
    Nuclear Site Locater

    Since the March earthquake and tsunami hit that Japan, there’s been no shortage of new apps designed to help users prepare for, deal with and even recover from a disaster.

  • After Disaster Hit Japan, Electric Cars Stepped Up Sunday, 8 May 2011 | 11:02 PM ET
    Residents travel on the opened road in front of the 4,724-tonne freighter "M.V. Asia Symphony", grounded by the recent tsunami in Kamaishi, Iwate prefecture on May 6, 2011.

    With oil refineries out of commission and clogged roads slowing gasoline deliveries, Japan turned to electric cars to help provide needed services after the earthquake and tsunami in March. The New York  Times reports.

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