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How I Made My Millions: Maker's Mark | Bananagrams | Stella & Chewy's

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

  • "Making A Mark" — Maker's Mark
  • The Samuels had been making bourbon whiskey for five generations when Bill Samuels decided to start over. He called his new bourbon "Maker's Mark." After the Wall Street Journal profiled the distillery, Maker's Mark received tens of thousands of new customers. Those customers soon expanded into millions and Maker's Mark became an icon in the whiskey industry.
  • "Top Banana" — Bananagrams
  • In 2005, three generations of the Nathanson family — headed by 75-year-old Abe — worked together to create a fast, fun and easily portable word game. They called it Bananagrams. Since then, the game has won several toy awards and brought in about $90 million in sales. It's also spawned several books and other games.
  • "Millions in the Making" — Stella & Chewy's
  • Vegetarian Marie Moody helped nurse her sick rescue dog, Chewy, back to health by feeding him a diet of raw meat and vegetables. She discovered that it not only healed Chewy, but it also helped her other dog, Stella. So in 2003, she launched Stella & Chewy's — a maker of frozen and freeze-dried pet products — now available in pet stores across the country.

WEB EXTRAS

  • 5 Things I Learned from My Entrepreneur Father Monday, 14 May 2012 | 12:04 PM ET
    Rena and Abe Nathanson

    Throughout my father's life, and during our time working together at our company, Bananagrams, he taught me some very valuable lessons that can be applied in the business world today.

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