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On the Money On the Money: Video

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  • Farming without dirt

    Reporter Andrea Day steps into the year-round “farm” to see where your next salad may be coming from.

  • Tuition-free college

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s plan would pay the tuition cost for full-time students whose families earn less than $125K per year. Sounds great but critics say the plan gives no additional aid to the poorest students. Beth Akers, Manhattan Institute, and Sara Goldrick-Rab, Temple University, discuss.

  • After Dow 20K

    If you’re not in stocks now, should you get in or is it too late? Richard Bernstein, CEO of Richard Bernstein Advisors tells us if this is a time for caution or an opportunity for growth.

  • DNA & diet

    Habit Founder Neil Grimmer launched the company after testing his own DNA. He explains how it works, how much it costs, and why nutrition is not “one size fits all.”

  • Food for football

    Plated, the subscription-based meal kit company has some easy to create recipes that go beyond chips and dip to make your Super Bowl party a big hit. With Elena Karp, Plated head chef and Culinary co-founder.

  • Trump & your money

    Politico Chief Economic Correspondent Ben White and Sara Fagen, DDC Advocacy partner, weigh in on what could change first and what could have the biggest impact on your wallet under a Trump Administration.

  • Pedro Rojas holds a sign directing people to an insurance company where they can sign up for the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare

    Reporter Bertha Coombs looks at possible options to replace Obamacare and what they could mean for your health and money.

  • Driving Detroit's growth

    Reporter Kate Rogers asks Motor City small business owners how policy changes in taxes, healthcare and regulations could help or hurt their companies.

  • Taxing questions

    Tim Speiss of accounting firm EisnerAmper discusses how and when changes under President Trump could hit your paycheck.

  • 401(k) fallout

    Some 40% of workers have less than $10K in these accounts and not everyone has access to one. Economist Theresa Ghilarducci says she has a bipartisan, public-private solution.

  • Detroit auto show

    With new vehicles in high demand, Phil LeBeau shows us some of the latest models.

  • Assembling Ikea

    We ask IKEA US President Lars Petersson what’s next for the world’s largest furniture retailer.

  • Closing the gap

    Sallie Krawcheck, Ellevest CEO & co-founder, explains why women don’t have to act like men to advance in the work place, and her take on the gender investing gap.

  • Mobile travel agent

    Lola co-founder and CEO Paul English explains his new messaging/personal travel app works and if the cost is worth the time saved.

  • Work perks

    As more companies offer flexible work arrangements, more workers are getting the opportunity to shape their schedule. Does it help companies in recruiting, and could you get the perk at your job?

  • Working the border

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection is looking for more than 1,700 new federal agents. Reporter Kate Rogers goes to the Border Patrol Academy in New Mexico to see what new recruits will have to tackle from fitness tests and combat training, to off-road driving.

  • Dow 20K, Trump & your retirement

    Should the Dow 20K milestone change what you’re doing with your retirement savings? We ask Wells Fargo Chief Investment Strategist, Jim Paulsen for tips on what you should do with a new President about to take office.

  • Couple with financial stress

    With the holidays over, and those bills coming due, how can you build a budget? While it sounds like a daunting task, personal finance expert Farnoosh Torabi has a step-by-step plan to get your finances under control.

  • January bargains

    January is the best time of the year to buy items including flat screen TVs, fitness equipment and more. Retail expert Trae Bodge shares what you should look for and where you can find the best deals.

  • Affordable fitness

    With new technology, big gyms say they’re now able to provide the custom workouts that only expensive boutique fitness studios have been able to offer. Using fitness trackers, they say private workouts including Pilates, Zumba and even kickboxing can be affordable. With CNBC's Diana Olick.

Contact On the Money: Video

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