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CNBC Poll: Do You Wish You'd Prepared Better for Retirement?

CNBC.com staff
Thursday, 6 Dec 2012 | 11:29 AM ET
Comstock Images | Getty Images

Baby boomers fortunate enough to have the means to retire have clearly planned for many years. Sometimes, though, they forget the last-minute issues -- the printouts and quiet conversations they should be dealing with at the office instead of the act of assiduously squirreling away money.


But experts advise their clients to start preparing the nitty-gritty financial aspects of retirement at least six months before telling anyone they're leaving. Yes, this involves a lot of paperwork. But if you quietly attend to these details before you leave the building, you will likely get more of your money's worth out of your employer.

This is especially important because it's much harder to get information from HR or details about your pension plan and stock options once you are no longer a walk down the hall away from the people with answers.

Are you a boomer who has it all planned out? Or do you wish you'd planned better? Take our poll and let us know.

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