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Instagram Pulls Its Photos From Twitter

Cadie Thompson
Monday, 10 Dec 2012 | 10:39 AM ET
Getty Images

Twitter confirmed Sunday that Instagram disabled its integration for Twitter, meaning previews of Instagram images are no longer visible via the social network.

Facebook-owned Instagram turned off Twitter cards — which embeds images into tweets — last week, but Twitter made the news official when it confirmed the news on its website.

"While tweeting links to Instagram photos is still possible, you can no longer view the photos on Twitter, as was previously the case," Twitter said in a company blog post.

Instagram, which originally was soley an application for mobile, has rolled out its own website. Kevin Systrom, Instagram's chief executive, said at a conference last week that his company wants to move traffic from Twitter to its own site "because we think it's a better user experience currently."

Instagram users can still tweet out a link to their photo-filtered image, but the link will send the user to Instagram's own website.

According to a report from The Wall Street Journal, Twitter will be rolling out its own photo-filtering app in time for Christmas.

Twitter did not immediately respond to request for comment.

Update: Twitter released an update Monday afternoon for its iPhone and Android apps that include eight photo filters and other photo-editing features.

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