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Power Pitch

Power Pitch Unison Q&A

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Name/Title/Company:

Manlio Carrelli, CEO of Unison Technologies

What is the mission of your company?

Unison is one of a handful of New York City start-ups with the ambition and potential to change the world. Our ambition is to give one billion office workers a new way to talk to each other and collaborate. We want to make working remotely as productive and meaningful as working in the same space.

Explain your business modelhow do you make money?

We have a free version of Unison, and a paid version which offers companies more control over their users and data.

Who do you compete with in this space and how are you different?

We compete with other 'social network for business' tools, such as Yammer (now owned by Microsoft). We are different because Unison is a "live" tool, not just text/photo posts and comments. In Unison you can "see" which coworkers are working on the same projects at you at this second, and talk live in groups instantly.

Where are your headquarters?

New York City

# of employees?

45 total employees. 30 are full time.

Year Founded?

2008

Funds Raised?

$10 million

Key Investors ?

The founder is Michael Choupak, who previously bootstrapped Intermedia into a large 'cloud computing' provider, then sold it to Oak Hill for $128 million.


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