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Airlines, Hotels Waive Fees for Boston Travelers After Bombings

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All of the major airlines and several hotel chains are waiving some fees and penalties for travelers looking to change their Boston travel plans after Monday's bombings at the Boston Marathon.

Participating airlines include AirTran, American, Delta, JetBlue (Boston's largest carrier), Southwest, United and US Airways. And several major hotel chains, including Hilton, Marriott and Starwood, will allow travelers to cancel reservations or leave early without a penalty, the USA Today reported.

Here's a summary of airline waivers as of early Tuesday.

AirTran: Boston passengers with flights booked for April 15-17 may reschedule their flights up to three days after their original scheduled departure date.

American: Boston passengers with flights booked for April 15-17 may reschedule their flights through April 20. The ticket reissue fee will be waived for one change.

Delta: Boston passengers with flights booked for April 15-17 may reschedule their flights through April 20. Ticket reissue fees will be waived, but a fare difference may apply.

JetBlue: Boston passengers with flight booked for April 15-17 may reschedule their flights through April 21. Both change fees and fare differences will be waived. For travel beyond April 21, the change fee will be waived, but a fare difference may apply.

Southwest: Boston passengers with flights booked for April 15-17 may reschedule their flights to within 14 days of the original travel date. Southwest has a standard policy of not charging change fees.

United: Boston passengers with flights booked for April 15-17 may reschedule their flights to within one year of the date of ticket issue. The change fee will be waived, but a fare difference may apply.

US Airways: Boston passengers with flights booked for April 15-17 may reschedule their flights through April 21. The change fee will be waived, but a fare difference may apply.

As always, check with your airline directly for any changes to the issued waivers.

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U.S. News