GO
Loading...

EA and Disney in Multi-Year Star Wars Games Deal

Star Wars The Old Republic
Source: swtor.com
Star Wars The Old Republic

Electronic Arts and Walt Disney sealed a multi-year licensing deal under which the videogame publisher will develop games for mobile devices, PCs and consoles based on the "Star Wars" movies.

Disney, which bought George Lucas's Lucasfilm and the blockbuster sci-fi franchise for $4.05 billion in October, will retain the rights to develop online and mobile games, both companies said in a statement on Monday.

They did not reveal the financial terms of the agreement.

EA bet big on the Star Wars' world of jedis and wookies in 2011 by releasing its "Star Wars: The Old Republic"—a massive multiplayer online game, or MMO, that allows thousands of people to play simultaneously for a monthly subscription fee as opposed to a one-time purchase.

Analysts said EA made a record investment of between $100 million and $300 million to build "Star Wars: The Old Republic," but EA has not disclosed costs. It hired more than 1,000 voice actors for "Star Wars: The Old Republic," which broke a game industry record.

But the game has struggled to retain players, prompting the company to offer 15 game levels for free in June last year. And in November, it launched a free-to-play version of the game.

Disney, which has its own interactive games division, last month shut the 30-year-old LucasArts games studio it inherited with the acquisition to focus on licensing its "Star Wars" brand externally.

EA shares were up 2 percent at $18.67 and Disney's stock was up slightly at $65.17 in after-hours trading. What's the stock doing now? Click here for the latest DIS and EA quotes.


Entertainment

Television

  • WASHINGTON, Sept 30- The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is considering a change in how it regulates Internet TV, potentially putting it on the same footing as traditional cable and satellite television, an FCC official familiar with the idea said on Tuesday.

  • TORONTO, Sept 29- Canada's broadcast regulator said on Monday it will ignore evidence from Internet-based video providers Netflix Inc and Google Inc when making new rules for television after the companies refused to hand over some data.

  • Sir Martin Sorrell, WPP CEO, discusses competition among Facebook and the social network sites, and the Atlas advertising platform. Sorrell says Google and Facebook like to say they are technology companies but they are media properties.