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Transportation Agency Drops Plan to Allow Small Knives on Planes

American Airlines employees protest at Los Angeles International Airport.
Getty Images
American Airlines employees protest at Los Angeles International Airport.

The head of the Transportation Security Administration says he's dropping a proposal that would have let airline passengers carry small knives, souvenir bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment onto planes.

The proposal had drawn fierce opposition from lawmakers, airlines and others who said it would place passengers and crews at risk. John Pistole told The Associated Press that dropping the proposal would allow his agency to focus on other programs.

Last month, 145 House members signed a letter asking Pistole to keep the current policy, which bars passengers from carrying knives and other items.

When Pistole released the proposal in March, he said the knives couldn't enable terrorists to cause a plane to crash.

(Read More: Tons of Profit, but Airlines Net Just $4 Per Passenger)

TSA screeners confiscate over 2,000 of the small folding knives a day from passengers.


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