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NJ's US attorney to announce major credit theft

Thursday, 25 Jul 2013 | 9:55 AM ET
John Lund | Getty Images

The U.S. attorney in New Jersey is set to announce indictments in what he calls the largest hacking and data breach scheme ever prosecuted in the United States.

Paul Fishman's office says five men have been indicted on charges of conspiring in a worldwide scheme that targeted major corporate networks.

The federal prosecutor alleges more than 160 million credit card numbers were stolen, resulting in millions of dollars in losses.

(Read more: Hacker Claims Airplanes Vulnerable at 30,000 Feet)

US Pressures China -- Wants Hacker Crackdown
CNBC's Scott Cohn reports on increasing pressure from the U.S. on China's cyberespionage efforts, Microsoft's Botnet bust and recent increase in spamming for profit.

A news conference is scheduled at 11 a.m. in Newark.

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  • CNBC's senior correspondent and lead investigative reporter, Scott Cohn also appears on "NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams," the "Today" and on MSNBC.

  • Co-anchor of CNBC's "Squawk on the Street," David Faber also is a co-producer of CNBC's original documentaries.

  • Eamon Javers is a reporter based at CNBC's Washington, D.C. bureau, appearing on business day programming and contributes to CNBC.com.

Investigations Inc.: Cyber Espionage

  • When a person enters information on a website, like an email or credit card, it gets stored in that company’s data base. Those web-based forms are a simple tool for users, but they are also another way hackers can exploit a company’s system. Instead of inputting a name into the website, cyber spies can put in a specially crafted text that may cause the database to execute the code instead of simply storing it, Alperovitch said. The result is a “malicious takeover of the system,” he said.

    By attacking business computer networks, hackers are accessing company secrets and confidential strategies and creating huge losses for the overall economy.

  • China is working feverishly to counteract its slowest GDP growth in recent years, and one of the ways it’s doing so, say U.S. officials, is through the theft of American corporate secrets.

  • US businesses are enduring an unprecedented onslaught of cyber invasions from foreign governments, organized crime syndicates, and hacker collectives, all seeking to steal information and disrupt services, cybersecurity experts say.

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