GO
Loading...

Fore! Could Tiger help resolve the CBS-TWC spat?

Thursday, 8 Aug 2013 | 11:38 AM ET
Getty Images

Will sports be the tipping point in the nasty fight between CBS and Time Warner Cable?

Golf fans with Time Warner Cable (TWC) service certainly hope so—because they won't be able to watch the PGA Championship on CBS this weekend, unless the network and the cable provider can resolve their contractual dispute that led to the blackout of CBS and Showtime. (The two sides did resume negotiations Thursday, CBS said).

(Read More: CBS-TWC spat heats up, politicians seek penalties)

The PGA Championship, held this year at the Oak Hill Country Club East Course in Rochester, N.Y., is the final major golf tournament of the season. And coming into this week, No. 1-ranked Tiger Woods and No. 2-ranked Phil Mickelson are in red-hot form.

TWC, CBS & the PGA
Peter Bevacqua, CEO of the PGA of America, discusses the battle between Time Warner Cable and CBS, as well as efforts to get the tournament in front of as many people as possible. He also talks about the competitiveness of the tour.

"We're certainly keeping our eye on that issue," PGA of America CEO Peter Bevacqua told CNBC on Thursday, as the first round got underway. "CBS has really done a great job of just keeping us abreast of all the developments."

"We have our fingers crossed" for a resolution, he said in a "Squawk Box" interview. "[But] if not, we'll work with CBS to try to get this championship … to as many households as possible."

More than three million TWC customers—including those in the top two TV markets of New York City and Los Angeles—are being affected by the blackout that began last Friday of the CBS-owned stations and cable networks.

Turning around Yahoo!
Michael Wolf, fmr. Yahoo! board member, Activate, discusses why he left the Yahoo! board. He also looks at activist efforts to get Sony to change its business practices. It's a win for shareholders, he says. Wolf also weighs in on Jeff Bezo's acquisition of the Washington Post.

"At the moment the cable operators have the leverage because the more that CBS is off the cable, the more that they realize the viewers don't need it," said media expert Michael Wolf, former Yahoo board member and president of Viacom-owned MTV Networks.

But if the blackout continues into the regular NFL season, he told CNBC, it's going to be a completely different ball-game. "People are going to be clamoring to have [CBS] back."

While the NFL's regular season kicks-off Thursday night, Sept. 5 on Comcast-owned NBC, the first games on CBS will be on Sunday, Sept. 8.

Fans of the popular CBS primetime shows, "How I Met Your Mother" and "The Good Wife," as well as the Showtime hit "Homeland," might have something to say with the premieres of those programs coming up next month as well.

By CNBC's Matthew J. Belvedere. Follow him on Twitter @Matt_SquawkCNBC.

  Price   Change %Change
CBS
---
TWC
---
CMCSA
---
YHOO
---
VIAB
---

Featured