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Jewelry theft probe sabotaged at home to Wall St. elite

740 Park Avenue in New York City is the scene to a rash of jewelry thefts.
Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images
740 Park Avenue in New York City is the scene to a rash of jewelry thefts.

At one New York City apartment dubbed "the world's richest apartment building," police are investigating a case of sticky fingers — to the tune of $250,000 in stolen jewelry.

But there's one problem: The building's co-op board is "sabotaging" the investigation, the New York Post reports.

To rid itself of the problem, the board has fired several employees who it believes are involved with at least four burglaries at 740 Park Ave., home to Blackstone's Steve Schwarzman, cosmetics heir Ronald Lauder, and business magnate David Koch.

(Read more: Finding Wall Street's missing money)

"They are firing these employees they think are doing these burglaries," said a source to the Post. "By the time detectives catch up with these workers, they've already lawyered up. You can't make a case against them. The board is sabotaging the [NYPD] investigation."

To read the Post's full piece, click here.

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