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PC sales in China will get crushed this year: IDC

Antony Dickson | AFP | Getty Images

Worldwide shipments of PCs are expected to fall almost 10 percent this year deepening what is already the longest market contraction on record, according to International Data Corporation (IDC).

But in a significant shift, PC sales in emerging regions, especially China, are expected to contract at a steeper rate than in mature regions, the research firm said.

IDC forecast a double-digit decline in PC shipments in China this year compared to 2012 on the back of consumer enthusiasm for tablets and smartphones.

One senior research analyst at IDC said the days where one can assume tablet disruptions were purely a "First World problem" were over.

(Read more: PC sales collapse: Is the Personal Computer dead?)

"Advances in PC hardware, such as improvements in the power efficiency of x86 processors remain encouraging, and Windows 8.1 is also expected to address a number of well-documented concerns," Jay Chou said.

"However, the current PC usage experience falls short of meeting changing usage patterns that are spreading through all regions, especially as tablet price and performance become ever more attractive."

The new forecast from the research firm reflects a continued expansion of mobile devices at the expense of PCs and a slowdown in emerging market growth which the industry had relied on in recent years, IDC said.

"The market as a whole is expected to decline through at least 2014, with only single-digit modest growth from 2015 onward, and never regain the peak volumes last seen in 2011," IDC said in its report.

Aside from "stubbornly depressed" consumer interest, 2013 marked the first year where "The repercussions of a slowing China, anxiety over the possible tapering of the U.S. quantitative easing program, and weak intrinsic PC demand are among a litany of factors that have rippled across portions of other formerly strong-growth areas, leading emerging markets as a whole to see declines through at least 2014."

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