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Layoffs at Chesapeake not over yet

Chesapeake Energy
Source: Chesapeake Energy
Chesapeake Energy

Chesapeake Energy plans to continue layoffs for about another six weeks, according to an internal email the company's chief executive sent to employees on Tuesday.

(Read more: Layoffs at Chesapeake Energy rattle employees )

"While Chesapeake is a strong and resilient organization that reflects our incredibly talented employees, we must adapt our organizational structure to become a sustainable, profitable company in the energy sector. Future staffing adjustments will likely be necessary to properly align resources and improve our overall operating and competitive performance," said Chesapeake's CEO Doug Lawler in the email, a copy of which was obtained by CNBC.

A comprehensive review of all areas of the company's business is underway and is being led by managers and employees from all levels, he said.

CNBC reached out to Chesapeake for comment, but has not yet received a response.

"A review of this magnitude for a company of our size takes time, and decisions can only be made after careful thought, consideration, evaluation, and deliberation. Our goal is to complete this process as quickly as possible, and we expect to finish by November 1," he said.

Meanwhile, employees are getting restless as they wait to see if they are going to get axed or not, according to a person at the company who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

"We knew it was coming, but we didn't know it would take this long. The process is so slow," the source said. "We feel like we are in employment purgatory."

So far, the oil and gas company has laid off people in the creative department, corporate development and the government relations department, according to the source.

The Oklahoma City television station KFOR-TV reports that sources say as many as 2,000 jobs may be cut. Chesapeake has about 12,000 employees.

—By CNBC's Cadie Thompson. Follow her on Twitter @CadieThompson

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